Folayang eyes ‘legend’ status vs Aoki

first_imgSmart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH PH among economies most vulnerable to virus Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 MOST READ Eduard Folayang of Team Lakay shows his fighting stance as he gears up against defending champion Shinya Aoki on November 11 for the One Championship lightweight title at the Singapore Indoor Stadium. INQUIRER PHOTO BY EV ESPIRITU/@eespirituINQEduard “Landslide” Folayang knows that to be one of the greats, he has to beat the best.Pitted against the high caliber fighter in Shinya Aoki in the main event of ONE: Defending Honor set on Friday in Singapore, Folayang is facing his greatest battle yet.ADVERTISEMENT 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas READ: Folayang gets title shot vs Asian ‘legend’ after long wait“Aoki is a legend in mixed martial arts and beating him will also make me a legend,” said the Baguio City native. “That will be a great motivation for me.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentA heavy underdog, the 31-year-old Folayang is determined to defy the odds.READ: ‘I’m ready’: Folayang going all out in bid for ONE title Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise EDITORS’ PICK Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine “I want to get that belt. I’ve worked my ass off for that belt. I believe even legends fall. I believe this is my time. When that time comes I will be the next legend,” Folayang, a champion in the URCC who is in his first title fight with ONE, said.“Some people think that I cannot beat Aoki but I believe in myself. This is a great opportunity for me to show them that they are wrong.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next We are young Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway View comments Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Pacquiao is my motivation, says Filipino MMA star Folayanglast_img read more

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Arong, Jose push FEU past Ateneo, force decider for Finals slot

first_imgAaron Black had 11 points to lead the Blue Eagles while Ravena filled the stat sheets with 10 points, six rebounds, and four assists.The scores:FEU 62 – Jose 20, Arong 13, Orizu 9, Comboy 8, Dennison 6, Inigo 4, Tuffin 2, Escoto 0, Trinidad 0, Ebona 0, Holmqvist 0, Nunag 0, Bayquin 0, Denila 0ATENEO 61 – Black 11, Ravena 10, Asistio 9, Go 8, Verano 7, Ikeh 5, Nieto Mi 4, Nieto Ma 3, Wong 2, Porter 2, Tolentino 0Quarterscores: 10-10,  23-20, 35-42, 62-61 Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Westbrook has triple-double, leads OKC comeback for OT win Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netRaymar Jose had a 20-20 game and Monbert Arong hit the big shots as Far Eastern University came back to stun Ateneo, 62-61, and force a rubber match in the UAAP Season 79 men’s basketball Final Four Saturday at Mall of Asia Arena.Jose posted 20 points and 23 rebounds while Arong scored five of the Tamaraws’ last seven points in the final one minute and 25 seconds. He hit a go-ahead jumper, 57-55, and sank two free throws for a 59-55 cushion with 24.3 seconds remaining.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town PH among economies most vulnerable to viruscenter_img We are young EDITORS’ PICK MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Racela, whose team hasn’t beaten Ateneo in the eliminations, said the biggest challenge was to get one game against the Blue Eagles and FEU did just that with a balanced effort.“Each and every person contributed to the cause, from the first to the 16th were able to contribute today,” said Racela. “I can’t remember one player who wasn’t able to contribute and that’s what we needed.”Ateneo built a 49-39 lead midway through the fourth, but the defending champions fought back and tied the game at 55 with 1:53 to go.Arong, who fired nine of his 13 points in the final frame, then scored five straight points capped by a free throw for a 60-55 edge with 11.4 ticks remaining.Prince Orizu had a near double-double with nine points and 10 rebounds while Wendel Comboy contributed eight.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 “I remember during the quarter break, myself telling the players not to break down,” said FEU head coach Nash Racela. “It was hard in the third quarter there were a lot of questionable calls, we were trying our best and we were close to giving in. We were committing mistakes after mistakes.”“Fortunately for us, us coaches were able to tell the players not to break down. True enough, they accepted the challenge. The whole team was really ready to pitch in,” he added.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliFEU and Ateneo dispute the last Finals slot on Wednesday, 4 p.m., at Smart Araneta Coliseum.Ron Dennison sealed the game with free throws, 62-58, with 3.7 seconds left before Thirdy Ravena made a meaningless triple as time ran out.last_img read more

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Alaska sends Dela Rosa to Star for big man Pascual

first_imgTaiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND PH among economies most vulnerable to virus The veteran mentor also lauded Dela Rosa for his performance during his stay with the storied franchise.“Rome has always carried himself with exemplary class and character. He is a fine young man, a great teammate, and a warrior on the court,” said Compton. “We will miss him indeed, yet the needs of the team dictated that we get a big, and we are excited to get a big the quality of Jake Pascual.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad AliPascual joins a vaunted Alaska frontcourt that includes Calvin Abueva, Sonny Thoss, Vic Manuel and Noy Baclao.Dela Rosa, meanwhile, adds depth to Star’s small forward spot that relies heavily on Allein Maliksi. Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine Compton said Hotshots head coach Chito Victolero called him on Wednesday to propose the trade.“When Chito and I were describing to each other both Rome and Jake, it honestly sounded like both players were like twins in terms of their character and toughness,” said Compton. “It is nice to see two PBA teams making a fair trade that should really benefit not only both teams involved, but also–and I think this was very important to Chito and I both–we believe it really benefits the players traded.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes Senators to proceed with review of VFA Jake Pascual (left) and Rome Dela Rosa. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAlaska traded versatile wingman Rome Dela Rosa for Star’s smooth shooting center Jake Pascual Friday.Aces head coach Alex Compton said Pascual will be reporting to their practice on Saturday after the trade that the Hotshots initiated.ADVERTISEMENT We are young MOST READ Ronaldo no dummy as he targets world treble As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town EDITORS’ PICK View commentslast_img read more

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Aces wallop Gin Kings, 101-86

first_imgHotshots sear Painters Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND Smart’s Siklab Saya: A multi-city approach to esports RJ Jazul was named Best Player of the Game after scoring a team-high 16 points.  Calvin Abueva added 12 for the Aces.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSFreddie Roach: Manny Pacquiao is my Muhammad Ali Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Alaska dealt Barangay Ginebra a masterful 101-86 beating last night to improve to 3-2 and a share of third place with four others in the PBA Philippine Cup at Smart Araneta Coliseum.The crowd-favorite Gin Kings, who topped the previous season’s Governors’ Cup, dropped to 2-3.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next PH among economies most vulnerable to virus EDITORS’ PICK View comments Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Where did they go? Millions left Wuhan before quarantine As fate of VFA hangs, PH and US forces take to the skies for exercise MOST READ Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Shanghai officials reveal novel coronavirus transmission modes We are young Senators to proceed with review of VFA Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PHlast_img read more

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Hunting, agriculture driving rapid decline of jaguars in South America’s Gran Chaco

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki New research finds that one-third of critical jaguar habitat in the Gran Chaco, South America’s largest tropical dry forest, has been lost since the mid-1980s.According to the study, led by researchers at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU Berlin) and published in the journal Diversity and Distributions this week, deforestation driven by agricultural expansion — mainly for soy and cattle production — has caused the steep decline of jaguar habitat in the region.Meanwhile, the conversion of jaguar habitat into cropland and pastureland gives hunters easier access to the forest. Thus overhunting and persecution by cattle ranchers has also become one of the chief causes of the big cat’s shrinking numbers, the study found. New research finds that one-third of critical jaguar habitat in the Gran Chaco, South America’s largest tropical dry forest, has been lost since the mid-1980s.According to the study, led by researchers at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (HU Berlin) and published in the journal Diversity and Distributions this week, deforestation driven by agricultural expansion — mainly for soy and cattle production — has caused the steep decline of jaguar habitat in the region.Meanwhile, the conversion of jaguar habitat into cropland and pastureland gives hunters easier access to the forest. Thus over-hunting and persecution by cattle ranchers has also become one of the chief threats to the survival of the big cat. Jaguars (Panthera onca) are especially vulnerable to hunting because they occur at very low densities and must range over large areas. The species is listed as Near Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.Alfredo Romero-Muñoz of HU Berlin’s Geography Department, the study’s lead author, told Mongabay that the 82,000 square kilometers (nearly 20 million acres) of jaguar habitat lost between 1985 and 2013 represents an area the size of Austria.“Seven million hectares of this key habitat degraded into habitat with high hunting risk for jaguars, while three million hectares degraded into areas with deforestation,” he said. “Furthermore, by 2013, a third of the remaining jaguar range was affected by both threats simultaneously. Jaguars may be at higher risk of disappearing — if they are not already gone — from these latter areas as both threats may interact and multiply their impact.”A jaguar in Bolivia’s Kaa-Iya National Park. Photo byDaniel Alarcón.“It is this synergistic cycle of deforestation, and hunting or poisoning, that are now the principle threats looming over one-third of the jaguar’s remaining range in the Gran Chaco,” study co-author Anthony Giordano, the director and chief conservation officer of the NGO S.P.E.C.I.E.S., emphasized in a statement.In order to study how jaguar habitat changed in the Gran Chaco between 1985 and 2013, Romero-Muñoz and team worked with several other jaguar researchers from across the region to compile a comprehensive dataset of jaguar occurrence and the variables that affect the charismatic big cats. The researchers then used computer models to reconstruct jaguar habitat in 1985, 2000, and 2013.“Our approach doesn’t only allow us to identify key jaguar habitat, but also areas under hunting threats, areas under threats of agricultural expansion, and areas where both interact within jaguar habitat,” Romero-Muñoz explained. “Assessing these maps through time can inform us how habitat changed over the last three decades across the Chaco, and also within countries and inside and outside protected areas.”Some study findings point to measures that can be taken to safeguard the future of jaguars, the top predator in the Gran Chaco eco-region. Larger protected areas were found to be better at preserving habitat than smaller protected areas, for instance.Map showing jaguar habitat change in the Gran Chaco between 1985 and 2013. Credit: Romero‐Muñoz et al. (2018). doi:10.1111/ddi.12843“Small protected areas lost jaguar habitat, either because forests were converted inside them, because hunters penetrate protected areas, or because jaguars are killed when they leave the reserves,” study co-author Tobias Kuemmerle, who leads HU Berlin’s Conservation Biogeography Group, said in a statement.The 1.1-million-kilometer Gran Chaco region extends from southern Bolivia, through western Paraguay, and into northern Argentina. “Among countries, Bolivia lost less key jaguar habitat than Paraguay and Argentina,” Romero-Muñoz said. “The main reason for this difference is probably the large, 3.4 million-hectares, Kaa-Iya National Park. Indeed, we found that larger protected areas lost proportionally less key habitat than smaller ones since the 1980s. However, 95% of the key habitat loss occurred in unprotected areas.”About 68 percent of the high-quality jaguar habitat that still remains is currently unprotected, the researchers found. But if the governments of Argentina, Bolivia, and Paraguay were to coordinate efforts to protect those areas, most of which are found within 200 kilometers of the countries’ international borders, the big cats might have a shot, the researchers suggest. “Our maps can inform us where conservation actions to save the jaguar should take place,” Kuemmerle said.Consumers can help play a role in saving the jaguars of the Gran Chaco, as well. “In this increasingly interconnected world, what we eat can have an impact in far-away regions,” Romero-Muñoz said. “Much of the beef produced in the Chaco is exported to Europe and Asia, and soy produced in the Chaco is also exported, mainly to feed animals. Therefore, a way to reduce our potential impacts on jaguars may be to reduce our individual consumption of meat, especially beef.”A jaguar with cubs in Bolivia’s Kaa-Iya National Park. Photo by Daniel Alarcón.CITATIONS• Quigley, H., Foster, R., Petracca, L., Payan, E., Salom, R. & Harmsen, B. 2017. Panthera onca(errata version published in 2018). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017: e.T15953A123791436. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-3.RLTS.T15953A50658693.en. Downloaded on 05 October 2018.• Romero‐Muñoz, A., Torres, R., Noss, A. J., Giordano, A. J., Quiroga, V., Thomson, J. J., Baumann, M., Altrichter, M., McBride Jr., R., Velilla, M., Arispe, R., & Kuemmerle, T. (2018). Habitat loss and overhunting synergistically drive the extirpation of jaguars from the Gran Chaco. Diversity and Distributions. doi:10.1111/ddi.12843center_img Agriculture, Animals, Beef, Big Cats, Biodiversity, Biodiversity Crisis, Cats, Cattle, Cattle Pasture, Charismatic Animals, Environment, Habitat, Habitat Destruction, Habitat Loss, Human-wildlife Conflict, Hunting, Jaguars, Mammals, Over-hunting, Pasture, Poisoning, Research, Soy, Wildlife, Wildlife Conservation last_img read more

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Peat protection rule may be a double-edged sword for Indonesia’s forests

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Hans Nicholas Jong Banner image: Fire set for peatland clearing in Riau Province, Indonesia in July 2015. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay. A government regulation issued in 2016 requires logging companies to restore peat with protected status in their concessions, mostly in Sumatra, and prohibits them from developing on it.But activists say this prohibition threatens a massive supply shortfall for two of the world’s biggest paper producers, which they warn could push the companies to source wood from unprotected forests in other parts of Indonesia.Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) and Asia Pacific Resources International Limited (APRIL) face a supply crunch of up to 30 percent and 25 percent respectively, according to an analysis by NGOs.Both companies dispute this finding, saying their supplies remain secure even as they seek to boost their output. JAKARTA — A logging prohibition in Indonesia aimed at protecting peatlands threatens a supply crunch for two of the world’s biggest paper producers that could drive them to source wood from as-yet-untouched forests elsewhere in the country, a recent study indicates.Suppliers of pulpwood, typically acacia, to Asia Pulp & Paper (APP) and Asia Pacific Resources International Limited (APRIL) are subject to an Indonesian government regulation that prohibits them from clearing peat forests with protected status, such as those with peat layers deeper than 3 meters (10 feet) and those that contain high biodiversity. The regulation, issued in 2016, also stipulates the conservation of at least 30 percent of all peat domes — landscapes where the peat is so deep that the center is topographically higher than the edges. Newly conducted spatial analysis shows that this type of peatland accounts for a combined 12,000 square kilometers (4,600 square miles) of these suppliers’ concessions — an area half the size of Vermont — located mostly in Sumatra.The study was carried out by a group of NGOs trying to verify whether the companies were complying with the regulation to conserve these deep-peat areas of their concessions.“We don’t know whether the peat concessions that should be protected have actually been rehabilitated or not,” Syahrul Fitra, a researcher with one of the NGOs, Auriga, told Mongabay. “We can’t access the work plans for conservation submitted by the companies to the government, and thus we don’t know what the companies are doing.”So the NGOs overlaid a government map of peat areas onto maps of the pulpwood concessions reportedly supplying wood to APP and APRIL. Their analysis showed the suppliers’ total concessions spanned 41,000 square kilometers (15,800 square miles), over a quarter of which constituted peat forests that should be protected.These affected zones represent 30 percent of the plantation area in APP’s supply chain, and 25 percent of APRIL’s, according to the analysis.Protecting them from being cleared for planting pulpwood would therefore be “likely to have significant negative impacts on each group’s overall wood fiber supply,” the study says.But in trying to protect areas of deep peat, the government regulation may inadvertently push the suppliers to clear forests elsewhere for their plantations, the study says. This includes the vast and mostly intact natural forests of Papua, in Indonesia’s far east, where oil palm growers are already clearing the land after having depleted much of the forests in Sumatra and Borneo.A pulp and paper plantation neighboring peat forest in Riau, Sumatra in 2015. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.Feeding the millThe potential supply crunch thrown up by the peat protection regulation comes as both APP and APRIL look to ramp up their pulp output.APP opened a massive new pulp mill in southern Sumatra’s Ogan Komering Ilir (OKI) district at the end of 2016, rated at maximum capacity to process 2 million tons of pulp a year. The company said it could feed the mill entirely through its own pulpwood plantations without having to rely on outside suppliers. But a 2016 analysis by various NGOs show APP’s overall demand for wood fiber in Sumatra could rise by more than 50 percent.APP’s current planted area, then, even under a high-growth scenario, won’t be sufficient to supply the company’s new mill and two older ones, with the company projected to face an annual shortfall of 3 million cubic meters (106 million cubic feet) of plantation wood.And that was before it was revealed that the new mill had actually been approved for a much higher maximum capacity: 3.25 million tons a yearThis has stoked fears among environmental activists that APP will have to source its supplies from natural and peat forests to feed the mill, as the company’s demand could increase by 85 percent if production at the OKI mill ramps up to the full 3.25 million tons.For its part, APP says it will not resort to clearing rainforests even after the OKI mill is operating at full capacity. It says it’s committed to its forest conservation policy (FCP) that espouses zero deforestation. Under the pledge, APP says it won’t accept timber sourced from the clearing of peatlands and rainforests.Auriga’s Syahrul questioned APP’s commitment, saying the company faced a supply shortfall even before taking into account its suppliers’ concessions affected by the peat protection regulation. The coalition’s analysis identified more than three-quarters of concessions in South Sumatra supplying wood to the OKI mill are on peatlands.Their spatial analysis shows that the largest areas overlapping with the peat protection zone are those surrounding the OKI mill, comprising nearly half of the land expected to be planted with pulpwood to serve as the mill’s fiber supply base.“If it’s true that APP’s existing suppliers must restore their concessions located within protected areas, then the suppliers won’t be able to meet the demand from APP because almost half of their concessions are affected,” Syahrul said.“So according to our analysis, the OKI mill will be heavily affected” by the regulation, he added.APP has downplayed the concerns, saying it has sufficient supply to meet projected demand at its mills through at least 2020. It says it has improved yields by cutting waste and cloning the most productive tree species for its plantations.Importing wood chips is also an option, the company said in a response to questions from Mongabay. “This allows us to purchase responsibly managed plantation wood chips from South East Asia and Australia to maintain adequate supplies of wood chips,” it said.APP has added 35 new suppliers since March 2018, according to its FCP monitoring website, including chip mills in Malaysia, Australia and Thailand. Fifteen of them were added in 2019 alone. The company says it’s taking on new suppliers to mitigate fluctuations in demand and local supply and to ensure future supply.Syahrul, though, said this onboarding of dozens of new suppliers only “affirmed our suspicion that APP doesn’t have enough supply.”Elim Sritaba, APP’s director of sustainability and stakeholder engagement, said the company could guarantee a sufficient fiber supply because it sources more than 96 percent of its fiber from existing suppliers. Only 2.5 percent of its fiber comes from one-time suppliers — the sole component of its supply chain for which supplies can’t be guaranteed in the long term — while the rest is sourced from community plantations under long-term partnerships, Elim said.“Even if we can’t secure the 2.5 percent fiber supply, we can just adjust our production,” she told Mongabay. “The question of whether there’s enough supply or not is merely about business. Recently we shut down our OKI mill because our pulp stock was too high and also for maintenance.”Syahrul said this in itself raised more questions. Seventy percent of the $2.6 billion tab for the initial phase of the OKI project was financed through loans from Chinese state-owned banks. The initial loan from China Development Bank has been described as “one of the largest financings ever signed between Indonesian and Chinese interests.”Activists like Syahrul say APP’s ability to pay off those loans depends on the profitability of the OKI mill, and thus APP may have no choice but to operate the mill at full capacity to service that debt within the 12-year tenure.APP, though, says paying off the loan “is not the responsibility of any single mill, but a shared responsibility borne by APP as a group,” and that to date the OKI mill is operating profitably below a threshold of 2.8 million tons a year.The completion of PT OKI Pulp & Paper Mill in South Sumatra — which has greater production capacity than initially advertised — has raised concerns among NGOs whether APP will be able to maintain its zero deforestation commitment. Photo of an acacia plantation in various stages of harvest by Rhett A. Butler for Mongabay.Fiber for fashionSyahrul has raised similar concerns about APRIL, whose parent company, Royal Golden Eagle (RGE), needs a growing supply for plant fiber as it expands into the textile industry in Indonesia.At its Kerinci complex in Sumatra’s Riau province, where APRIL’s flagship mill is located, RGE recently built a large mill to produce viscose staple fiber (VSF) from plant cellulose. VSF is increasingly popular in the textile industry as a less water-intensive, and thus eco-friendly, alternative to cotton.During the annual World Economic Forum in January, RGE director Anderson Tanoto said VSF could help the fast-fashion industry become more sustainable, touting it as biodegradable and “sourced from sustainably managed tree plantations.”But the spatial analysis of APRIL’s suppliers shows the two concessions that have historically been the prime sources of pulpwood for the mill in Riau will be particularly affected by the peat conservation program.The analysis found that a combined 2,383 square kilometers (920 square miles) of these two concessions, controlled by APRIL subsidiaries PT Riau Andalan Pulp & Paper (RAPP) and PT Sumatera Riang Lestari, fall within peat protection zones. Together, they represent 40 percent of the concessions of APRIL’s suppliers that should be protected, the NGO coalition says.Like APP, APRIL has made corporate commitments to manage its plantation operations on drained peatland areas responsibly. But the coalition says both companies’ commitments need to be monitored through strict government supervision “to ensure that the peat protection zones within their licensed areas remain protected.”Responding to the supply concerns about its new foray into the textile industry, APRIL said there wouldn’t be an increase in production capacity, and thus no increase in the group’s overall pulpwood requirements.“Dissolving pulp production will be done within the current pulp production capacity of 2.8 million tons [annually],” APRIL said. “Volume will be periodically determined based on market demand.”However, the coalition said the company had not released enough details about its expansion for independent analysts and civil society organizations to verify the claim.APRIL said that while it couldn’t disclose its long-term wood supply plans because they were commercially sensitive, production capacity will remain at 2.8 million tons a year until at least 2025. Like APP, the company says it is also looking to increase efficiency and cut waste in order to boost productivity.Syahrul said APRIL was still exporting dissolving pulp, from which VSF is made, to its sister company in China, Sateri, which also produces the fiber, putting further pressure on its supply. In 2016, APRIL exported 90,000 tons of dissolving pulp to Sateri mills in China; export volumes increased to 240,000 tons in 2017 and an estimated 500,000 tons in 2018.APRIL said it would reduce its exports to accommodate the demand from the Kerinci mill, targeted to produce 240,000 tons of VSF a year.“Reducing exports aren’t that easy if there are long-term contracts,” Syahrul said. “And if they do reduce their exports, will it be by the same amount as the increase in demand due to their expansion in Indonesia? Or will they still need to increase their production? If it’s the latter case, then there’s a possibility they will open up new plantations or continue cultivating on peatlands.”The tree from which APRIL derives its dissolving pulp is an acacia species, Acacia crassicarpa, grows best on peatland. Syahrul said this indicated the company would continue “cultivating in protected peat areas by planting Acacia crassicarpa based on the justification that the species is peat friendly.”“But planting a species suitable on peatland isn’t the same as restoring peat,” he added.The company said that “regardless of source, all wood supply that comes into APRIL’s mill must comply with our Sustainable Forest Management Policy. The safeguards for sustainable fiber production are well in place and independent audit shows we are upholding these commitments.”Fire set for peatland clearing in Riau Province, Indonesia in July 2015. Image by Rhett A. Butler/Mongabay.Opaque numbersThe Ministry of Environment and Forestry says 67 pulpwood firms and 127 plantation firms that are required to protect and rehabilitate their peat concessions have already done so. In all, they have restored 31,000 square kilometers (12,000 square miles) of peat areas nationwide, according Karliansyah, the ministry’s head of environmental degradation mitigation.He said the government’s Peatland Restoration Agency (BRG) had restored another 9,000 square kilometers (3,500 square miles), for a combined total that far exceeds a national target of restoring 24,000 square kilometers (9,300 square miles) of degraded peatlands by 2020.But the NGO coalition disputes that claim, saying the 31,000-square-kilometer figure for the private companies cannot be independently confirmed. Syahrul said the government had failed to disclose detailed information on the implementation of the companies’ restoration plans or any follow up to the plans, which are required to be carried out immediately upon approval.“We were surprised when we heard the number,” he said. “We can’t get the names of the companies, and so there’s no way for us to check the number. And that figure is only an aggregate, it only distinguishes between pulpwood plantations and palm oil plantations.”Karliansyah said the ministry couldn’t publicly disclose the data for each company because of privacy concerns. Both APP and APRIL also declined to disclose their peat restoration plans, saying only the Ministry of Environment and Forestry had the authority to decide whether the documents should be made public.APRIL said an ecosystem restoration program it launched in 2013 aimed to restore 1,500 square kilometers (580 square miles) of peat ecosystem on Riau’s Kampar Peninsula. APP said it had retired 70 square kilometers (27 square miles) of plantation land, an initiative announced in 2015. That area represents less than 1 percent of the peat concessions managed by the company and its suppliers as indicated by the NGO coalition.APP’s Elim said the company had since 2015 retired more than the initially declared 70 square kilometers, but wouldn’t give a new figure, deferring again to the government. She said the focus of the peat protection initiative shouldn’t be on the total area restored, but on the quality of the restoration, especially the effectiveness of efforts to rewet drained peatlands.“So we don’t want to focus on the number. That’s why APP always reports on forest fires” in its concessions, she said.Syahrul said the government and companies should still disclose their peat restoration plans and progress to the public to allow for independent verification of their claims.“Because if we’re talking about natural resources, we’re not only talking about the rights of the companies, but also the implication [of their businesses] on the greater public,” he said. “When these companies fail to restore their concessions and they start burning again, those affected will be the public.”The secrecy surrounding companies’ peat restoration efforts also threatens to derail the wider move to restore peatlands nationwide, given that the largest area of such ecosystems falls within existing concessions.Syahrul said it was also crucial to restore peat ecosystems as a whole, not partially, because fires could still spread from unrestored peat concessions to restored areas.Government-restored areas, he said, “are connected to peat areas inside concessions. And if you truly want to restore a peat ecosystem, you can’t do it partially.”For a government agency like the BRG to ensure the restoration initiative is effective, it needs access to companies’ full restoration plans documents, he added.“It’s just wrong to see an institution established solely to restore peatland not be given access to that information,” Syahrul said. “The BRG can’t even monitor [peat restoration progress] if it’s located inside a company’s concession.” carbon, Carbon Emissions, Deforestation, Dry Forests, Ecosystem Restoration, Fires, forest degradation, Forest Destruction, Forest Fires, Forests, Industrial Agriculture, Landscape Restoration, Peatlands, Pulp And Paper, Rainforest Deforestation, Rainforest Destruction, Rainforests, Restoration last_img read more

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