Nile Rodgers Confirms New Daft Punk Single and Hamptons Dance Party

first_imgNile Rodgers, the funkified mastermind behind Chic, is proud to announce the first ever Nile Rodgers Dance Party Monday, August 19th. The one day only event will take place at the Martha Clara Vineyards in Riverhead, NY (the Hamptons). The concert has sold out all its cheapest tickets to Riverhead locals, but tickets are still available via the sponsoring charity, aftee.org: HERERodgers, the co-writer of Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky” wrote on his website he is piecing together, “…some of the hottest acts and surprises on the planet that day… which happens to be around the time the next Daft Punk single drops (I’m just saying).” With the confirmation of a new Daft Punk single at the end of August, and a possible appearance by the powerhouse duo at the festival, the Nile Rodgers Dance Party’s lineup is still under wraps.  Rodgers has a playlist on his site featuring a playlist with Duran Duran, David Bowie, and Pharrell Williams. Besides showcasing some Chic classics, Rodgers will undoubtedly bring forth some incredible acts of today. Aftee’s website explains how the event hopes to blend together the instrumental dance music of the seventies with some of today’s best DJ’s.General Admission5 p.m. General Admission Gates OpenWPPB 88.3 Tent – Interviews with Bonnie GriceAFTEE Wifi Photo Party and “AFTEE Facebook” Party7 p.m. – 10 p.m. Nile Rodgers + Chic and Special Guests10 p.m. After-AFTEE Party at Suffolk Theater, Riverhead, and other venuesVIP and BNB Presenters Lounge5 p.m. VIP Entrance & Sponsors Reception – Northville Pavilion5 p.m. – 8 p.m. VIP Gourmet Tasting Tent Party and Silent Auction5 p.m. – 10 p.m. BNB Backstage Lounge Meet-and-Greet Party7 p.m. – 10 p.m. Nile Rodgers + Chic and Special Guests10 p.m. After-AFTEE Party at Suffolk Theatre, Riverhead, and other venuesFood Trucks at VenueAndy’s Italian Ices NYCarl’s Steaks Food TruckDesi Food TruckFood Freaks Grilled CheeseHampton Coffee Co.Hibachi HeavenMontacoSilver Spoon SpecialtiesThe Wandering PalateWatch the Press Conference:last_img read more

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Larkin Poe Perform Songs From ‘Self Made Man’ For ‘CBS This Morning’ Saturday Sessions [Videos]

first_img[Video: CBS This Morning]After releasing Self Made Man last June, the band followed that up with the arrival of their Kindered Spirits covers album in late November, which featured their studio takes on songs originally made famous by Neil Young, Phil Collins, Lenny Kravitz, The Allman Brothers Band, and more.The southern rock band had planned to embark on a lengthy world tour behind the two new albums beginning in March 2020, but those dates were derailed following the emergence of COVID-19. Larkin Poe was the featured ‘Saturday Sessions’ musical act on yesterday’s episode of CBS This Morning, where the Nashville-based band led by sisters Rebecca and Megan Lovell treated viewers to a healthy dose of scorching southern rock with performances of three songs from their 2020 Self Made Man album.In addition to rocking their way through the blues-rock inspired “She’s A Self Made Man”, the band’s television appearance from inside an empty Nashville church also included energizing renditions of “Holy Ghost Fire” and “Back Down South”.Watch the three performances as seen during Saturday’s episode of CBS This Morning below.Larkin Poe – “She’s A Self Made Man” – CBS This Morning Saturday Sessions[Video: CBS This Morning]Larkin Poe – “Holy Ghost Fire” – CBS This Morning Saturday Sessions[Video: CBS This Morning]Larkin Poe – “Back Down South” – CBS This Morning Saturday Sessionslast_img read more

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OUT IN THE YARD — Gardening terms: An overview

first_imgA couple of years ago, I was giving a presentation to interns and was using terms that were not familiar to these newbies. I learned a lesson after repeated questions. After working in the garden and reading countless articles, you start to take for granted common terms used in gardening. I will explain a few below:Heirloom Plants There are many varieties of plants and vegetables. The natural way of propagation is through pollination and seed production to ensure the plant survives into the next life cycle. Heirloom varieties are plants that are open pollinated, meaning self-pollinated or pollinated by insects, and have been around for more than 50 years.There is usually a story of their origin. The offspring of heirloom plants inherit all the same traits of the parent plant and are called “true to their seed.” There are many heirloom vegetables including squash, cucumbers, beans and tomatoes. Probably, the best- known heirlooms are tomatoes such as Black Krim, which came from Krim Russia where foreign soldiers liked them and brought home their seeds.Brandywine seeds were found in seed catalogs from the mid-1800s. Many others have stories of seeds being passed down for generations. Heirloom usually have something to make them unique such as size, shape, or a particular flavor. They can sometimes have undesirable traits such as cracking or crevices. HybridsHybrids are plants that are a crossbreed between two varieties. They have been crossed either by nature or manually.This is usually done to bring out qualities from both parents to create a better vegetable that is disease-resistant, of uniform size, smooth skin, etc. You can keep seeds from hybrids but it is very random on which traits will be passed along. Normally hybrid seeds are not saved.GMOscenter_img Genetically Modified Organisms are plants that humans modified in a way that cross pollination could not naturally accomplish. This is done by manipulating the DNA so that is it still the same plant with drastically altered traits. Most publicized GMOs are soybean and corn, which were altered to resist a specific herbicide. There are other common ones in use such as sugar beets, many types of cotton, squash and zucchini altered to have higher yields.Soil amendmentsTerms for soil amendments can also cause confusion. Mulch is an organic matter laid on top of the soil. It is usually wood chips, grass clippings or hay. Mulch is never mixed in the soil since it has not decayed. It would pull nitrogen from the soil to aid in decomposition. Mulch is used for weed control, moisture retention and slow release of nutrients.Soil amendments that are added to soil include lime, peat, manure, vermiculite, perlite, humus and fertilizers. These alter the soil in some way such as pH, friability, drainage, etc. Compost is organic matter that has had time to decompose and will add nutrients in forms that plant roots can absorb.There are so many more terms such as deadheading, chill hours, annual, biennial, organic, natural, etc. Maybe in a future article I can cover these.If you have any questions about gardening in general, you can reach Jefferson County Master Gardener Tim Schreck at timothyrschreck@gmail.com or call Texas A&M AgriLife Extension at 409-835-8461.last_img read more

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JCSO: Carjacking, stolen tractor & stolen guns leads to wild scene, arrest

first_imgA local man is accused of stealing a tractor, stalling out on Hillebrandt Bridge and carjacking an elderly man during an early morning crime spree, authorities said.Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office deputies responded to FM 365 at the Hillebrandt Bridge in reference to an aggravated robbery just after 7 a.m. Monday.Investigation revealed a man had stolen a John Deere tractor just minutes earlier from a nearby ranch. Also taken in the theft were two handguns, the Sheriff’s Office said.According to witnesses, the thief was unable to drive the tractor up the bridge, causing vehicles to come to a stop and begin backing up.The armed man got off of the stalled tractor, police said, and “ran up to an elderly male motorist and stole his truck at gunpoint.” Garrett was arrested at approximately 6:30 p.m. Monday in Beaumont.Bond for the aggravated robbery is set at $500,000 and the bond for unauthorized use of a motor vehicle is set at $250,000, according to information from the Jefferson County Correctional Facility.center_img The assailant was last seen Monday morning heading towards Port Arthur in the stolen truck.The victim was not injured.The stolen vehicle was later recovered in Port Arthur.During the investigation, Jefferson County Sheriff’s detectives developed a lead on the suspect, and Monday afternoon an arrest warrant was issued for 33-year-old Garrett Piazza of rural Jefferson County for aggravated robbery.last_img read more

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Lin-Manuel Miranda Recruited for Coalition for NYC Hospitality & Tourism Recovery

first_imgLin-Manuel Miranda(Photo: Emilio Madrid for Broadway.com) View Comments May 12 was a bit of a day for Lin-Manuel Miranda and Hamilton fans everywhere: the news broke that Disney’s previously announced filmed performance of the musical’s original Broadway cast will be available to view on Disney+ on July 3. When NYC & Company announced the formation of the Coalition for NYC Hospitality & Tourism Recovery, Miranda was tapped to join.Miranda has been recruited to assist in offering his theater industry insight to help revive New York City’s tourist trade once coronavirus pandemic restrictions lift. The coalition will also include Ellen Flutter of the Natural History Museum, Thelma Golden of the Studio Museum of Harlem, Danny Meyer of Shake Shack and Peter Ward of Hotel Union.As previously reported, all Broadway productions will now stay on hold—and will offer refunds and exchanges—through September 6. An official return date has not yet been announced.Miranda recently shared he was working on Netflix’s Tick, Tick…BOOM! movie, starring Tony winner Andrew Garfield, when New York City started closing down businesses. “We can’t wait to get back to work,” he said The Tony winner and his family also recently established the #RaiseUp campaign, a collection of auctions and sweepstakes to benefit the Hispanic Federation in their efforts to raise essential funds for immigrant communities impacted by COVID-19. Learn more here. Star Files Lin-Manuel Mirandalast_img read more

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Shawnee resident Karen Dillon earns prestigious national honor from Society of Professional Journalists

first_imgA Shawnee journalist’s exploration of the increasingly perilous realities of the depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer in western Kansas has earned national recognition from the Society of Professional Journalists.Freelance investigative reporter Karen Dillon learned last week that her piece, “Running Out of Water, Running Out of Time,” which was published in the Kansas Leadership Center’s The Journal quarterly magazine had been selected for a Sigma Delta Chi award from SPJ. Just 77 honorees were chosen from approximately 1,200 entries, and Dillon was the only Kansas-based journalist to earn an honor.Dillon characterized the honor as a victory for everyone involved in The Journal — and a rare example of a publication getting behind deep investigative reporting in the current media environment.“Winning this national award is fantastic not just for me but for my team and The Journal,” Dillon said. “Because the media industry especially in Kansas is in such financial straits, the number of reporters in newsrooms across the state has been reduced dramatically, sometimes by 75 percent and more over the past decade. Long-term investigative type reporting takes a lot of resources, money and time. So we are seeing very few reporters with the ability to tackle these long-term investigative-type stories.”She credits editor Chris Green with being willing to invest the time and resources needed to execute the piece. Over six parts, Dillon documents in great detail projections for the longevity of the aquifer, which provides crucial water for crop irrigation in western Kansas agriculture, efforts to reduce water usage in the area, and what policy steps leaders have considered — with varying success — to address the issue.“[The] Ogallala story is such an important one for all of us in Kansas, I’m glad Chris Green and The Journal agreed to take it on and spend so much time digging for the truth,” she said. “This award recognizes the hard work that we put into this story and also makes a statement that small publications with few resources can do the big stories.”last_img read more

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Singing the tunes of credit unions with NCUF’s multi-award winner Christopher Morris

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr This industry is loaded with good people. I’ve worked in a number of industries throughout my career and I have never experienced so many happy people so eager to tell their story. I hope this industry never loses its humble, selfless demeanor — because it’s truly refreshing compared to a lot of other verticals out there.That said, we invited a person on the show who exemplifies this credit union ethos: NCUF’s Director of Communications Christopher Morris. His laid back, giving nature and zeal for credit unions is quite infectious — as you will see in this interview. Complementing his optimistic outlook, Chris has also won quite a few industry awards recently — one of which is Credit Union Times’ Trailblazer 40 Below for his many contributions to the industry.For those of you who don’t know, Chris was instrumental in getting CUaid.coop started just after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the Gulf states in 2005. CUaid has raised millions of dollars over the years to help credit union staff and members recover from various natural disasters and other devastating events. He is also a member of The Disclosures, a band that produces financial literacy-focused songs — just releasing their recent kids’ CD “The Secret to Being Rich” with his bandmate Chad Helminak from the Wisconsin Credit Union League.Suffice to say, Chris is a fine example for a fantastic industry loaded with equally fantastic people doing great things to make a difference in consumers’ lives. Enjoy the show!Visit:NCUF.orgthedisclosuresmusic.comcuaid.coop continue reading »last_img read more

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News Scan for Jun 17, 2020

first_imgFace masks allow virus-containing droplets to escape, study findsIn a study with implications for COVID-19 transmission, mild coughing can expel small saliva droplets through and around a face mask and travel as far as 1 meter (3.3 feet), according to a study published yesterday in Physics of Fluids.Researchers from the University of Nicosia in Cyprus simulated airborne droplet transmission for a person with and without a mask using computer models and found that, while masks may reduce airborne droplet transmission and protect the wearer from other people’s saliva droplets, they provide incomplete protection against the many droplets that spread around and away from them.Mask certification standards define a surgical mask’s effectiveness as a constant value and don’t take into account fluid flow dynamics, droplet leakage through mask openings, or the effects of repeated coughing, which can saturate the masks and reduce their efficiency, the authors said.The study showed that 10 cough cycles reduced mask efficiency about 8%, and severe coughing and longer mask-wearing time would reduce it even further.The researchers found that saliva droplet sizes change constantly during cyclic coughing because of interactions between the face and the mask, which typically have gaps of 4 millimeters (0.16 inches) to 1.4 centimeters (0.55 inches).”Masks decrease the droplet accumulation during repeated cough cycles,” lead author Talib Dbouk, PhD, aid in an American Institute of Physics press release. “However, it remains unclear whether large droplets or small ones are more infectious.”The authors called for physical distancing, new criteria for assessing mask performance and assessment that consider flow physics and cough dynamics, and provision of more complete personal protective equipment to healthcare workers, such as helmets with built-in filters, face shields, disposable gowns, and double sets of gloves.”The implications of the reduced mask efficiency and respiratory droplet transmission away from the mask are even more critical for healthcare workers,” they wrote.Jun 16 Phys Fluids study Jun 16 American Institute of Physics press release Study shows 5% rate of COVID-19 among symptomatic healthcare workersSeattle emerged as the first hot spot of novel coronavirus infections in the United States in February, and new data on testing of symptomatic healthcare workers (HCWs) shows 5.3% tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The study is published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.To conduct the study, Seattle-area investigators tested 3,477 symptomatic healthcare workers in March and April at drive-through and walk-through sites for employees in the University of Washington Medicine system. A total of 185 employees (5.3%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. The prevalence was similar between frontline healthcare workers (5.2%) and medical staff (5.5%).Symptomatic employees also filled out a survey prior to testing. Of employees who tested positive, 61.6% said they were experiencing fatigue, 59.5% had headaches, 58.4% reported a cough, and 38.4% complained of fever. Only six healthcare workers required hospitalization, and none died.”Rapid and high throughput testing of HCWs for COVID-19 is feasible using drive-through and walk-through testing clinic models and facilitated the rapid return of SARS-CoV-2 negative HCWs to work,” the authors concluded. Jun 16 Clin Infect Dis studylast_img read more

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