Peters & May acquires Complete Freight

first_imgComplete Freight, together with its founders and directors Angus Bruce Jones and Simon Judson and their staff, will become wholly absorbed into the Peters & May global operation, based at the UK headquarters in Southampton.Founded in 2004, Complete Freight specialises in marine logistics for international race events, individual yacht race campaigns and team supplies and spares.Peters & May has more than 30 years’ experience in the provision of marine logistics and offers global boat transportation and freight forwarding via air, road, rail and sea from a global network of 12 offices and numerous exclusive agencies. On an annual basis, the company ships 8,000 vessels through 150+ ports in more than 60 countries.www.petersandmay.comlast_img read more

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Yusen targets projects in Brazil

first_imgWith booming automotive, industrial and energy industries, Brazil has become a key player in the global projects market, said Yusen. The team will help support the company’s overall project cargo network, as well as develop services to help meet the growing demand for such business in South America.”The focus on the Brazilian market comes at exactly the right time to match the increase in demand for these services,” said Marcos Pultrini, project team leader. “While we have provided project support in the past, the formation of this team as part of our global project network is a real advantage to our customers in this market.”The team will provide global project consultation, planning and implementation across all modes of transport. Yusen will handle breakbulk cargoes, over-dimensional heavy machinery and equipment, and organise ro-ro and heavy lift ocean services, as well as out-of-gauge shipments on container vessels.Yusen said that although the team will cover all industries, its services will focus on industrial goods, energy components and general machinery.”In many cases, it more cost effective to import heavy equipment and machinery from the USA, Europe and China, than it is to build these same parts in Brazil,” said Pultrini. “We expect to see much growth in this area.”www.br.yusen-logistics.comlast_img read more

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How To: use social media

first_imgThe normally sure-footed John Lewis Partnership demonstrated the risks of ‘engaging’ with shoppers through Twitter in September, when its upmarket grocer, Waitrose, urged people to complete the Tweet: ‘I shop at Waitrose because…’. What came back in this open forum was not the anticipated free endorsement of its products by respectful online regulars.Instead came lines such as:‘…because Clarissa’s pony just WILL NOT eat Asda Value Straw’‘… because I once heard a 6yr-old-boy in the shop say “Daddy does Lego have a ‘t’ at the end, like Merlot?”’‘…because Tesco doesn’t stock unicorn food’‘… because I was once in the Holloway Road Branch and heard a dad say “Put the papaya down Orlando”’.The story was reported in the national press, reaching a chortling public much wider than the Twitterati. Other Twitter errors have seen sports stars disciplined and former celebrity partners engage in undignified spats, while one juror wound up serving time after befriending one of the accused in a case through Facebook.All of the above may add to the gaiety of the nation. But lawyers, for whom risk management is a core concern, could be forgiven for wanting to run a mile, instead of composing their next 140-character message (the length-limit imposed by Twitter). As Gavin Ingham Brooke, chief executive of professional services communications agency Spada, says: ‘Several of our clients have been extremely nervous about engaging with social media, and some would say rightly so. There can be no denying that the online realm offers far less opportunity for “control” due to the sheer speed of diffusion and borderless nature of social media.’TwitterTo ‘tweet’, an account must be opened, which is free. Choosing to ‘follow’ other people’s accounts means their ‘tweets’ (updates to a maximum of 140 characters) appear in a ‘newsfeed’ for you to follow. The same can be done for themes or events, where the addition of a hash tag (‘#’) makes the comments of many people on the same topic findable. People can message each other publicly or in private, and also ‘reply’ to other tweets, while including weblinks.Face to a nameYet august institutions, leading law firms, high-profile solicitors and QCs are all among those who have a presence on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. They may even use the internal social media platform Yammer to encourage dialogue with and between staff. And there are also blogs and ‘Wikis’. Why do they do this? The answer is because, notwithstanding the risks, the main social media platforms have become a mainstream element of how people and organisations communicate with one another. As Ingham Brooke explains: ‘Around 50% of business journalists now source their stories from Twitter, and we are seeing the lines between online and traditional media become increasingly blurred.’It is that level of permeation that has led the legal world to pay attention to social media. Consider just a few of the organisations which have a presence on social media – the House of Lords has a Twitter account (@UKHouseofLords), with 11,854 followers. Global law firm Clifford Chance’s graduates Facebook page has 1,892 ‘likes’, with 103 people ‘talking’ about it. LinkedIn, meanwhile, is a favourite forum for closed ‘alumni’ groups – now deemed important to maintain by law firms who see lawyers who leave go to work for clients, and competitors who they may in turn wish to recruit from. Simmons & Simmons’ alumni page on LinkedIn has 2,774 members involved in 23 separate discussions.But although the case for deploying social media is well made, using it involves a change in mindset. For a communications or marketing team schooled in issuing press releases, the two-way feel of social media – both its advantages and its risks – feels unfamiliar. As Daniela Conte, senior communications & PR manager at Simmons & Simmons, says: ‘The strength of social media is that it isn’t simply for “pushing” messages outwards. We also use it as an important tool for monitoring the market and for receiving feedback.’LinkedInUsers can access the most basic level free, loading their CV, inviting people to ‘connect’ with them, endorsing others’ skills and having their own skills and posts endorsed by others. Profiles can be viewed publicly, and LinkedIn is commonly checked by prospective employers and those looking to commission freelancers. Recruiters and headhunters are also active on LinkedIn. Members can join closed or open ‘forums’, where other members can be sent messages and discussion threads can be opened.Clare Rodway, managing director of Kysen PR, advises: ‘A golden rule from real life you need to observe on these social media platforms is to be skilful in your communication and make sure you listen twice as much as you speak. So, on Twitter for example, remember it’s not just a platform for promoting yourself and your own point of view. It’s easily as valuable for information-gathering; learning what’s in other people’s minds.’Too big to Tweet?Recognition of the importance of organisations’ ‘alumni’ networks has grown rapidly. Higher education institutions responded to the possibilities here first, while law firms complement alumni events by ‘hosting’ the online alumni group. The risks are much lower than for engagement in an open forum, yet still accord with the less exclusive business mindset that accompanies the use of social media networks. Organisations with a LinkedIn page are creating a forum for members to communicate with each other, as well as receiving information ‘from above’.FacebookA social networking site with variable privacy settings that is free to join. It can be used for personal updates, posting links to other web pages, sharing pictures, sending private messages and organising events. It has a ‘social’ bias, but can overlap with the world of work and charity fundraising. Many include current and former colleagues – and even clients – among their ‘friends’.Larger commercial organisations seem as comfortable with spaces and forums, such as those available through LinkedIn, as smaller ones. But back on those open forums, there are bigger challenges. A member of a smaller practice, such as media lawyer David Allen Green (Jack of Kent), who as @DavidAllenGreen has over 37,000 twitter followers, can be personal and ‘authentic’ in an easy, instinctive way that a large commercial law firm or a cabinet minister may struggle with. Eilidh Wiseman, partner at the law firm Dundas & Wilson, says: ‘In order to succeed at that challenge, the people you speak to on social media must believe that “you are you”.’She explains: ‘For large firms like Dundas & Wilson this creates a challenge. How do you speak with one voice when you operate in many different markets?’ One way to achieve an authentic voice is to segmentalise the target audience. As Conte notes: ‘It will depend on the audience we are trying to engage. While students might be comfortable in engaging with us through Facebook as part of our graduate career programme, clients may have different expectations of the channels our lawyers will use to interact with them.’Top tipsBe generous on social media sites – help others promote their own links and thoughts.Use direct promotion sparingly.‘Link’ to interesting material.Recognise that you are taking a risk by being in open forums. Listen to what comes back to you – positive or negative.Where people have ‘engaged’ you directly, then even if you cannot respond to all of them, respond to enough to show you are an authentic online presence.Be a regular presence.License staff and colleagues to use social media, but remind them that the same rules apply as ‘in real life’ (IRL). Consider training.Help to connect contacts and followers to one another. LinkedIn is ideal for this.Facebook may be a better way to reach students.Join other groups and discussions – you cannot expect everyone to come to your space.‘We always emphasise that social media is never a one-size-fits-all model,’ Ingham Brooke stresses. ‘It is incredibly important to build a bespoke strategy which supports your firm’s business objectives and which will reflect and project its brand values appropriately.’Law firms also need to find ways to trust their lawyers and staff to be active and engaged with the social media they have chosen. Without that activity, any interest in the organisation or the lawyer will quickly wither. ‘Resourcing is key,’ Ingham Brooke advises. ‘We would never encourage a client to set up social media accounts in a burst of excitement, for them only to be left dead in a few months once the novelty has worn off.’ Bear in mind, Rodway counsels, ‘any unwise comments or outright gaffes cannot be permanently removed – any damage done to reputation can be fatal’.Training may help – or at least a reminder that some of the same rules on communication using social media apply which also apply ‘in real life’ (IRL, as it is known on the internet). Ingham Brooke adds: ‘[Users must] ensure they are firstly comfortable enough with the channels to avoid any mishaps, and secondly able to achieve the delicate balance between injecting personality and exercising free speech – all while adhering to the firm policy and guidelines.’Follow meHaving decided to obey such rules, the opportunities for direct promotion that lead straight to new instructions or recruits may seem frustratingly small. David Laud, CEO of Samuel Phillips Law Firm, advises: ‘Promoting your business via social media is acceptable in moderation.’ He advocates ‘the one in six’ rule: ‘Make five posts curating content for followers and connections, retweet others’ posts and send non-overt promotions, then you can plug an event, blog, service.’ He adds: ‘Entertain and share with your network. Who would tune in to a channel that was 100% advertising?’Lawyers like family law practitioner Andrew Woolley (@woolleyandco, 1,742 followers) practises this approach in tweeting, mostly providing links and brief comments on items in the public domain. It is, it seems, the fact that he is not ‘in your face’ that appeals. One must also be persistent. Laud notes: ‘Results won’t be instant but “a little and often”, and a consistent approach will build your profile.’And, of course, a patiently-built following can also be useful when a platform is needed to deal with negative publicity. Rodway concludes: ‘If you haven’t invested in building a following or establishing your own network, you then have no audience, so effectively no voice to counteract anything that is being said about you. Any adamant denials, corrections, assertions you might make would effectively be “shouting in an empty room”.’Eduardo Reyes is Gazette features editorlast_img read more

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Most care cases continue to miss 26-week deadline

first_imgThe average time it takes to conclude care proceedings is showing no improvement, according to quarterly statistics published today.Figures released by the Ministry of Justice, covering April to June, show that the average time for a care and supervision case to reach first disposal remained the same as for January to March – 33 weeks. This is the longest average interval since the last quarter of 2013.Four in 10 care cases were completed within the statutory 26-week limit introduced in the Children and Families Act 2014.The impact of the rising number of care cases on the family justice system has been a long-standing concern for presidents of the family division.In 2016 Sir James Munby described the ‘seemingly relentless rise’ in the number of new care cases. ‘The fact is that we are approaching a crisis for which we are ill-prepared and where there is no clear strategy to manage the crisis,’ the now-retired judge said.Unveiling an action plan to deal with what he called an unprecedented and unsustainable volume of family cases, Sir Andrew McFarlane said ‘delay in decision making is likely to be contrary to a child’s best interests’.Today’s statistics also show that the number of divorce petitions was down by 13% in April to June compared to the same period last year. But the mean time from petition to decree absolute was 58 weeks, up three weeks from last year. The ministry pointed out that the 58-week figure is almost two weeks down from the record high that was reached between January and March, which was the result of regional divorce centres processing a backlog of cases.Family lawyers were quick to comment on the divorce figures.Desmond O’Donnell, a partner at Kent firm Thomson Snell & Passmore, said various factors were contributing to the time it takes to progress divorce cases, such as more individuals acting in person who often file incorrect paperwork, and a decrease in the number of full-time judges.Laura Burrows, an associate in the family team at Collyer Bristow, said the figures were no surprise to those working in the family justice system and that the problems would ‘not be resolved quickly or easily’.The latest statistics bulletin covers digital petitions for the first time – 11,129 petitions were made between April and June, representing 40% of all petitions for that period. However, the ministry said the online divorce system began in May 2018 following a small pilot and it was ‘too early’ to make quarterly comparisons on timeliness.last_img read more

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Highlights from InnoTrans 2000

first_imgOVER 800 exhibitors crammed six halls of Berlin’s trade fair grounds on September 12-15 at InnoTrans. Outside, on 2 km of track laid between the halls and in sidings beyond, around 50 items of rolling stock, some of which had been kept under wraps for unveiling at the show, drew crowds of visitors. More than 700 guests attended the opening ceremony, where Mayor Eberhard Diepgen described InnoTrans as ’the leading trade event’ for the industry. Numerous specialist conferences were held in parallel, including the first East European and Asian Rail Summit, at which senior managers and transport ministers discussed common problems and debated how to improve their communications.Star of the outdoor show was undoubtedly the LiReX lightweight experimental train (right of photo) developed by the German arm of Alstom and assembled by Fahrzeugtechnik Dessau. Hundreds of curious engineers and other visitors photographed every accessible detail of the six cars, inside and out. Less visible was the roof-mounted equipment, which included four MAN diesel-generator power packs, two energy storage flywheels, and air-conditioning modules.Other multiple-units on show included an Adtranz dual-system Contessa for DSB (above left) and an Alstom Lint 41 diesel railcar for Connex subsidiary Nord-Ostsee-Bahn to work regional services in Schleswig-Holstein (left).Much interest was generated by motive power for Germany’s independent operators, which included a Siemens Class 152 from the Dispolok pool and a Craiova-built six-axle electric for KEG.Sleeping car offers quieter nightsPassenger rolling stock available for inspection included a prototype WLABmz sleeping car for DB Nachtzug. One of 42 being built by PFA of Weiden under a 40m euros contract for delivery from January 2001, it will enter service on routes such as Berlin – Paris and Dortmund – Milano.The air-conditioned car has a new body on an underframe taken from a Bm234 inter-city coach. New SGP400 3SMG air-suspension bogies able to run at 200 km/h are being supplied by Siemens’ Austrian subsidiary, SGP. Each car offers 36 berths in 12 compartments, of which three are fitted with private shower and Semvac retention toilet; ultra-violet sterilisation ensures the water is of drinking quality.Each compartment can be sold as a single, double or three-berth, and connecting doors can be used to form suites for families or small groups. A system for wake-up calls is fitted, and there is an intercom for passengers to call train staff. VingCard security systems are installed for passengers to lock their own compartments, and repeaters ensure good reception for mobile phones.DB Nachtzug is also taking delivery of 10 service cars converted from InterRegio bistro vehicles.SZ Desiro handed overJust two years after Siemens unveiled its Desiro modular multiple-unit concept for regional operations at InnoTrans 1998, the first production unit was handed over to Slovenian Railways in Berlin on September 12. In a colourful ceremony featuring Slovenian dancers and a German brass band, Siemens representatives Dr Dietrich Mlast_img read more

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One dead as two car bombs explode in Somali capital

first_imgFire fighters attempt to extinguish a burning car after an explosion in Mogadishu, Somalia September 22, 2018. REUTERS/Feisal Omar Fire fighters attempt to extinguish a burning car after an explosion in Mogadishu, Somalia September 22, 2018. REUTERS/Feisal OmarOne person died and another was injured in two car bombs that exploded in the heart of the Somali capital on Saturday and the Islamist group al Shabaab claimed responsibility for the attacks.The bombs detonated in two different cars near a main road in the centre of the city. Al Shabaab frequently carries out bombings in Mogadishu and other parts of the Horn of Africa country.“Two people were injured in the two car bombs. One of them died of the wounds,” said Major Mohamed Hussein, a police officer.A car burns at the scene of an explosion in Mogadishu, Somalia September 22, 2018. REUTERS/Feisal OmarAl Shabaab told Reuters they had planted the car bombs and that they were targeting a police official but that he had escaped.Another police officer, Ahmed Nur, said one of the cars was parked and had nobody in it, while the second was moving and the two people inside it had been injured. One of the injured is the one who later died.On Friday, at least three people were killed in separate attacks in Mogadishu, including a female university student shot dead in her class by two men armed with pistols.Al Shabaab is fighting to topple Somalia’s Western-backed central government and establish its own rule based on its own strict interpretation of Islamic sharia law. Car bomb kills at least two in Somali capital – police Deadly car bomb blast rocks Somali capital 11 killed in car bomb blast in the Somali capital Mogadishu The group also wants to drive African Union (AU)-mandated AMISOM peacekeepers out of the country.Relatedlast_img read more

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MPP-Dairy enrollment continues to slide in 2017

first_imgDairy farmer participation in the federal dairy income safety net program, the Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy), continues to slide, based on 2017 enrollment data released by USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA). John Newtonjnewton@fb.org, director of the American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) Market Intelligence, analyzed 2017 MPP-Dairy enrollment data released by FSA on May 26, highlighting national and state-level participation.advertisementadvertisement20,314 herds enrolledFor the 2017 calendar year, 20,314 dairy operations enrolled in MPP-Dairy, about 49 percent of the 41,809 licensed dairy operations reported by USDA in 2016.Once enrolled, a dairy farmer may not exit the program for the life of the 2014 Farm Bill, which expires at the end of 2018. However, herds enrolled during 2017 are down 5,349 from 2016, a decline of 21 percent. According to Newton, the decline is likely due to farms that had yet to make a coverage election as of May 19, when the data was compiled, or dairy farm operations that had gone out of business.View milk production enrolled in MPP stats. A vast majority of the operations enrolled for 2017 are at the catastrophic $4 per hundredweight (cwt) coverage level. Only 1,507 operations, approximately 7 percent of enrolled operations, elected to purchase coverage above $4 per cwt. Coverage at buy-up levels is down from 2015 and 2016, when 56 percent and 23 percent of the farms had coverage above $4.50 per cwt, respectively.advertisement64 percent of milk coveredMilk volume covered under MPP-Dairy at any level is about 138 billion pounds, 64 percent of estimated U.S. milk production in 2017. Milk covered in 2017 is down 13 percent from 2016, when 159 billion pounds of milk was enrolled.Nearly all milk enrolled in the 2017 coverage year is at the catastrophic ($4 per cwt) coverage level only. Buy-up enrollment for 2017 is at the lowest level since the program was introduced. Approximately 2 percent of the milk is at buy-up coverage levels of $4.50 per cwt and above.This total is down from 2015 and 2016, when 38 percent and 12 percent of the milk was enrolled at buy-up coverage levels, respectively. Of the 3.1 billion pounds of milk with buy-up coverage, 62 percent is enrolled at the $6 or $6.50 per cwt coverage levels.State and regional enrollmentNewton provided a breakdown of individual state and regional data:• In California, 973 producers covered about 31 billion pounds of milk. All but one producer covered production at the $4 per cwt level.advertisement• In Wisconsin, 5,260 producers covered about 19 billion pounds of milk. Of those, 4,777 (91 percent) selected the catastrophic coverage, with another 391 selecting coverage at $6-$6.50 per cwt levels.• The top five states in terms of milk volume covered under MPP-Dairy in 2017 are California, Wisconsin, Idaho, New York and Texas. At an operation level, the top five states are Wisconsin, Minnesota, New York, Pennsylvania and California, representing 60 percent of the enrolled dairy operations.• Operations electing buy-up coverage and protecting a higher percentage of milk were concentrated in the Upper Midwest and Corn Belt.Decline expectedThe decline in 2017 MPP-Dairy enrollment – which closed last December – was anticipated for a variety of reasons, including the combination of a more favorable outlook in dairy markets and the program’s poor actuarial performance, said Newton.First, the risk of a large increase in feed costs was low due to higher feed inventory levels in the U.S. and abroad. With feed prices expected to remain low, and improving milk prices, the likelihood of MPP-Dairy making payments in 2017 was low. As of late May, USDA’s MPP decision tool placed a 1 percent probability on the MPP-Dairy margin falling below $8 per cwt during 2017.Second, MPP-Dairy has not met the expectations of dairy producers. While milk prices have declined since 2014, the lower feed prices meant the MPP-Dairy margin did not fall substantially. MPP-Dairy made some payments in the spring of 2015 and 2016, but those payments did not surpass the premiums and administrative fees paid by farmers. For the 2015 and 2016 coverage years, AFBF estimates dairy farmers paid approximately $100 million in premiums and administrative fees, and received $12 million in program payments.Changes coming in 2018 Farm Bill?The MPP-Dairy enrollment period for 2018 coverage is scheduled to open in July. Beyond that, the future of MPP-Dairy and structural adjustments recommended for the 2018 Farm Bill have been the topic of numerous congressional hearings already this year.Darrin Siemen, a fourth-generation dairy farmer from Harbor Beach, Michigan, told a Senate Agriculture Committee field hearing in early May that MPP-Dairy, “has failed to deliver the protection farmers need and expect. While MPP remains the right model for the future of our industry, changes are needed if Congress wants to prevent dairy farmers like me from going out of business,” he said.Included among recommendations put forth by the National Milk Producers Federation are the following: restoring the MPP-Dairy feed cost formula to its original form; directing USDA to obtain more precise feed cost data to more accurately reflect true costs and margins; improving program participation affordability by reducing supplemental premium costs for operations producing 4 million pounds of milk or less per year; and calculating margins on a monthly basis rather than six times per year.AFBF is working to make MPP-Dairy changes to provide producers more flexibility and better coverage, Newton said. In addition, AFBF’s Insurance Services division has been working on a new insurance product, Dairy Revenue Protection, which if approved, would be similar to the Livestock Gross Margin for Dairy (LGM-Dairy) program offered through USDA’s Risk Management Agency and sold by crop insurance providers.Projected future federal spending for dairy falls short of programs for other commodities, according to the Michigan Farm Bureau. The Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) most recent baseline projected annual farm-level cash receipts in the dairy sector at about $39 billion — behind only the value of corn and soybeans.While CBO estimated the farm value of milk production between 2018-2027 at $389 billion, it projects federal outlays in dairy during the same period will total $749 million. The ratio of outlays to the farm value of milk production is less than one-quarter of one percent. That compares to 4 percent for corn, 2 percent for cotton; 26 percent for peanuts; 1 percent for soybeans and 12 percent for wheat.Read also:MPP-Dairy still a safety net formula, with adjustmentsWhat’s in it for you? Dairy producer, processor groups outline policy prioritiesMPP-Dairy scrutinized during House ag committee hearing Dave NatzkeEditorProgressive DairymanEmail Dave Natzkedave@progressivepublish.comlast_img read more

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Researchers Succeed in Transmitting Energy Wirelessly Using Microwaves

first_imgScientists from Japan have succeeded in transmitting energy wirelessly, in a key step that could one day make solar power generation in space a possibility. Researchers used microwaves to deliver 1.8 kilowatts of power, enough to run an electric kettle – through the air with pinpoint accuracy to a receiver 55 metres (170 feet) away. While the distance was not huge, the technology could pave the way for mankind to eventually tap the vast amount of solar energy available in space and use it here on Earth. According to The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), this was the first time anyone has managed to send a high output of nearly two kilowatts of electric power via microwaves to a small target, using a delicate directivity control device. JAXA has been working on devising Space Solar Power Systems for years.Solar power generation in space has many advantages over its Earth-based cousin, notably the permanent availability of energy, regardless of weather or time of day. While man-made satellites, such as the International Space Station, have long since been able to use the solar energy that washes over them from the sun, while getting that power down to Earth where people can use it has been the thing of science fiction.But the Japanese research offers the possibility that humans will one day be able to farm an inexhaustible source of energy in space. The idea would be for microwave-transmitting solar satellites, which would have sunlight-gathering panels and antennae – to be set up about 36,000 kilometres (22,300 miles) from the earth.But it could take decades before we see practical application of the technology – maybe in the 2040s or later. There are a number of challenges to overcome, such as how to send huge structures into space, how to construct them and how to maintain them. The idea of space-based solar power generation emerged among US researchers in the 1960s and Japan’s SSPS programme, chiefly financed by the industry ministry, started in 2009.last_img read more

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Listen to Christmas Day Preview Show: Cavs-Warriors

first_img Related TopicsBasketballCavsChristmasClevelandGolden StateKyrie IrvingLebron JamesNBASteph CurryWarriors Matt Medley is co-editor at NEO Sports Insiders, covers the Cleveland Cavaliers, Cleveland Indians and high school sports in Northeast Ohio.Follow @MedleyHoops on Twitter for live updates from games. Matt Medleycenter_img Listen to a special edition of the CavsLand, Ohio Podcast, as Matt Medley and Brandon Larador preview the big Finals Rematch on Christmas Day between the Cleveland Cavaliers and Golden State Warriors.last_img read more

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Medina Bees Move to 6-0; Beat Brunswick Blue Devils 41-7

first_img Matt Loede has been a part of the Cleveland Sports Media for over 21 years, with experience covering Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, the National Football League and even high school and college events. He has been a part of the Cleveland Indians coverage since the opening of Jacobs/Progressive Field in 1994, and spent two and a half years covering the team for 92.3 The Fan, and covers them daily for Associated Press Radio. You can follow Matt on Twitter HERE. Related TopicsBrunswick Blue DevilsGreater Cleveland ConferenceJimmy DawMedina Bees Matt Loedecenter_img The Book Shelf LLC brings you a recap for week four Friday battle between the Medina Bees and the Brunswick Blue Devils.BRUNSWICK, OHIO – The beat rolled on Friday night in Brunswick for the Medina Battling Bees, as a team putting up over 50 points per game had little issues with the 1-4 Brunswick Blue Devils, walking away with a 41-7 victory.The Bees move to 6-0 on the season, and seem to be heading for a showdown with the Solon Comets in the last week of the regular season for control of the Greater Cleveland Conference.Medina got a big night from senior running back Jimmy Daw, who barreled his way to 215 yards on 21 carries with a rushing touchdown. He also pulled in three catches for 33 yards, including a 39-yard touchdown on a screen pass.Backup quarterback Calvin Montgomery filled in nicely for injured quarterback John Curtis, who was hurt late in last weeks win over Strongsville 42-23.Montgomery ended the night 16-for-23 for 243 yards and four touchdowns, including a 70-yard score to junior wide out Dylan Fultz that tied the game at seven in the first quarter.The Blue Devils continue a tough season as they fall to 1-5 on the season after an opening night win at home over Medina Highland.They haven’t won since, and Friday had an early 7-0 lead after an opening drive touchdown, but were not able to sustain their momentum from there.Senior running back Jake Martin had 94 yards rushing to lead the Blue Devils, but was held to just three yards in the final two quarters after a productive first half.Fellow Blue Devils running back Jake Vadini scored the only Brunswick touchdown of the night on a 14-yard run in the Blue Devils opening drive, and ended the game with 62 yards on 16 carries.Blue Devil quarterback Cole Zamiska was held to just 4-for-9 passing for 66 yards and was pressured a number of times by the Bees defense.Brunswick went 7 plays and 66 yards to start the game to take a surprising 7-0 lead, with Martin accounting for 42 yards between rushing and receiving on the drive.Vadini went over from 14 yards out to give the Blue Devils a 7-0 lead with 9:26 to play in the first quarter.It took the Bees awhile to get going, but finally Montgomery hit Fultz with a 70-yard score with 1:28 to play first quarter to tie the game at seven.Medina would dominate from there, as they took control on their next drive, as Daw went into ‘beast mode’ with an electric 75-yard touchdown run to go over the 100 yard rushing mark and make it 14-7 Bees.Daw scored another second quarter touchdown as he pulled in a screen pass from Montgomery and rumbled 39 yards across the field to give Medina a 21-7 lead with 6:31 left in the half.After a Blue Devils 3-and-out the Bees struck for their third score of the quarter, as Montgomery hit tight end Alex Whittaker for a 24-yard score to make it 27-7 with 3:32 left in the half.Daw went the distance on the final play of the half, but a holding penalty brought it back and the half ended with the Bees up by 20.Medina didn’t wait long to put the game away in the third quarter, scoring in just four plays going 66 yards as Montgomery again hit Whittaker from 16 yards out on a seam route to make it 34-7.The Blue Devils were stopped by an aggressive Bees defense in the second half, and their best threat stopped at the Bees 14-yard line with 5:39 to play third quarter.The final score came from backup running back Keith Tector, as he galloped 60 yards in the games final minutes to put the Bees ahead 41-7.The Bees will look to stay undefeated next week as they will take on Mentor at home to try and get to 7-0. The Blue Devils look for win number two as they play at Shaker Heights.last_img read more

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