NPR Music Shares Archival Mavis Staples ‘Tiny Desk Concert’ [Watch]

first_imgNPR Music has dug into its vaults for a re-release of a Tiny Desk Concert from legendary singer Mavis Staples back in 2010. As the live music shutdown continues, NPR Music has continued to pull from its expansive vaults, sharing old concerts from the salad days of the now-ubiquitous online concert series. Additionally, the public radio outlet has transitioned to allowing artists to become their own videographers with the Tiny Desk (Home) Concert series.Host Bob Boilen opens the session with an anecdote about how he used to throw on The Staples Singers on Friday night at the record store he worked at back in the 1970’s, before introducing the former Staples Singer and iconic vocalist. The concert opens with “Only The Lord Knows”, which originally featured Jeff Tweedy playing acoustic guitar on Staples’ then-upcoming 2010 record You Are Not Alone. Instead, the blues tune gets the electric treatment here from guitarist Rick Holmstrom, who also played on You Are Not Alone as well as with Staples’ touring band.Next came the somber title track from You Are Not Alone which, despite a dreary guitar tone, offers a message of hope. The song is made all the more uplifting when Staples and Holmstrom restart the tune in a fit of laughter after Staples misses her cue, prompting Holmstrom to remind everyone, “it’s a new song.” Finally the session closes out with a throwback to The Staples Singers with “I’ll Take You There”. Hopefully the song made Boilen feel like he was back in the 1970’s, working in that record store.Watch Mavis Staples perform on NPR Music’s Tiny Desk Concert, which was originally released on August 8th, 2010.Mavis Staples — Tiny Desk Concert[Video: NPR Music]Staples is gearing up for her 80th birthday live stream celebration on July 31st. The concert, presented by A Newport Folk Revival, will feature her alongside Jason Isbell, Brandi Carlile, Ben Harper, Trombone Shorty, Grace Potter, and many more. Click here for more information and to order the stream.last_img read more

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Senate Panel Frets Over Bioterror Preparedness Six Years After Anthrax Attacks

first_imgThe attacks prompted a push in Congress and the executive branch to develop vaccines against anthrax and to improve responses to future scares. Lieberman requested a lessons learned report from Gerald W. Parker, principal deputy assistant secretary of Health and Human Services for preparedness and response, who also testified at Tuesday s hearing. Tara O Toole, director of the Center for Biosecurity at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, said, In 2005, the national intelligence report said they were most worried about a bioterrorism attack – they thought it was more likely than a nuclear attack. Those are the only two types that could destabilize the United States. Lieberman suggested one solution would be to entice the nation s biggest pharmaceutical companies to become involved, since they could handle mass vaccine production easier than smaller companies like VaxGen. Two anthrax-laced letters were sent to Capitol Hill. The first, to then-Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, D-S.D., was discovered Oct. 15, when an aide in his office opened one of the letters. Thirteen Senate and four House offices were contaminated. Among those who died in the attacks were two postal workers at the Brentwood facility in Washington, who had been exposed to the letters sent to the Capitol. But no new anthrax vaccine has been developed since the halt to a 2004 contract that was intended to procure 25 million doses of an anthrax vaccine in two years for a national stockpile. The small biotechnology firm that got the contract, VaxGen, could not deliver on major milestones. Cohen said his department also has been working on improving the first responders gear to combat possible exposure to these elements.The department is also looking at using cell phones as sensors, Cohen said. Cell phones are now mini-computers, Cohen said. Everyone of us would have a sensor and would then report to 911 the location, the fact that there was a radiological or biological event. Everyone talks about what keeps you up at night post-9/11, said Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman, I-Conn., chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. This keeps me and a lot of other people up at night, for reasons we discussed: the threats of bringing biological agents into the country or actually preparing them here and then the propensity they have to multiply and spread to devastating consequences. In 2001, five people around the country died from anthrax exposure.center_img A report to the committee by the Government Accountability Office, released Tuesday, said more than $100 million per year could be lost as current anthrax vaccines in the national stockpile begin to expire; vaccines worth $12 million have already expired and cannot be used, according to the report. Vaccine Problems It was not clear what, if any, conclusions about the flawed VaxGen contract could be applied to a future contract, said Keith Rhodes, chief technologist at the Center for Technology and Engineering, Applied Research and Methods at the GAO. Nearly 1,200 of about 4,000 who were tested for anthrax at the Capitol had to go on the aggressive antibiotic Cipro, some for as long as 100 days. The Hart Senate Office Building was closed until Jan. 22, 2002. Jay M. Cohen, Homeland Security undersecretary for science and technology, said the department is focused not only on vaccines but also on other projects such as Biowatch, an aerosol monitoring program of sensors in 30 major cities that alert if there are biological agents. There have been four million tests for anthrax and no false positives since the program was started in 2003, he said. Six years after a series of deadly anthrax attacks on Capitol Hill and elsewhere, members of a Senate committee expressed concern Tuesday that the government still lacks a coherent strategy for preventing and combating exposure to the deadly bacterium. O Toole said the Biodefense Advanced Research and Development Authority passed last year by Congress is an attempt to fix various problems – but no money has been appropriated yet. That is sending, I think totally unintentionally, but very loudly, a message to the biotech and pharma companies in this game that Congress doesn t really take biodefense seriously. But O Toole said the bioterror threat requires not just a vaccine, but a whole system of preparedness and response. Our narrow gauge and focus on some of these programs has also lead us to miss some opportunities, she said. It s going to take a long time, frankly, and a lot more money than what we ve invested at this time. last_img read more

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Davies Presents a Practical Approach to the Use of Artificial Intelligence in EMS Systems…

first_img“I’m not suggesting that everyone in EMS needs to become a technology geek,” Davies said, “but every EMS system must have an awareness of what is on and just beyond the horizon to keep public safety responders prepared to serve the populations of the future.” Integrating the EMS Agenda for the Future and artificial intelligenceIncreasing numbers of the medically fragile in society based on access to technologyHomeland security considerations of autonomous systems including intentional and unintentional disruptionsExceedance probability, cascading failures, and connected system conflictsThe future of EMS systems, manned and unmanned In his EMS Today 2016 presentation Artificial Intelligence: Bridging Human Decision-Making and Technology in EMS, Josh Davies, MA, CEM, said, “The speed of the advancement of technology, and in particular autonomous systems, is exponentially faster than at any previous time in history. If EMS organizations are not on top of what is just down the road, they will like suffer from inefficiency, higher costs and customer service challenges.” Most EMS providers use some level of autonomous systems today ranging from automatic vehicle locator (AVL) systems, remote inventory control, wireless vehicle disruption capabilities, and telemetry. Davies’ presentation bridged the current use of technology with new mandates and laws that are already effective and provided examples of how artificial intelligence can benefit an EMS organization in meeting the Triple Aim and in making EMS safer for the professionals who provide emergency services every day. “No doubt that the integration of technology is awesome and exciting, but the primary reason everyone must understand it is that it provides the opportunity to keep EMTs, paramedics and first responders safer as they do their job,” Davies said. “Technology provides a new level of safeguards that can keep our responders more aware of hazards and limit the chances of injury or death.”center_img The session provided an overview of the role of the Internet of Things (IoT), connected vehicle technology (including dedicated short-range communications), and self-driving or autonomous vehicles in emergency medical services systems today, in the near future, and in the next decade. The presentation also addressed: For more coverage of EMS Today 2016, click here.last_img read more

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Northern Nevada Medical Center Resumes Performing Elective Surgeries

first_imgQuality in EMS: Past, Present and Future Other changes being made at the facility include a universal masking of all persons entering the hospital, isolation of patients with COVID-19, presurgery curbside COVID-19 testing of patients, a provisioning of personal protective equipment for staff, temperature checks, and a screening questions on entering the premises. Located in Sparks, the Northern Nevada Medical Center (NNMC) hospital has decided to resume performing elective surgeries in the wake of a sustained downward trend of coronavirus cases, according to a report from KOLO8. RELATED Patients who arrive for elective surgeries must be screened four days in advance, which will be done in a “drive up” manner at the front of the NNMC. Paramedicine Strategic Planning Implementing Protocols to Administer Blood Products in the Prehospital Settinglast_img read more

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NJ Teen EMS Volunteer Qualifies for COVID Dose, Can’t Find Pfizer Vaccine

first_imgPfizer also requires storage at temperatures if minus 70 degrees Celsius, and only certain facilities – like hospitals – are equipped to handle it. The Moderna dose also has to be frozen, but at minus 20 Celsius, like a regular freezer. In addition to all the local, county and state health officials she’s queried, as well as her pediatrician, Carole has also called several hospitals and their parent healthcare companies, and even Sen. Cory Booker, looking for tips. But Kelsey is 16 years old, and can only receive the Pfizer vaccine, which is cleared for people as young as 16. The Moderna vaccine is only for people 18 and older. Kelsey Quinones is 16 years old, and can only receive the Pfizer vaccine, which is cleared for people as young as 16. Cranford has a paid EMS squad that operates Monday through Friday during the day, and the volunteers cover the night shift and weekends. The town’s administrator did not immediately return a call seeking comment. This week, the difficulty of the 16-year-old being able to get a vaccine grew tremendously as the state opened up eligibility to anyone 16 to 64 years of age with certain medical conditions or smoke, and anyone over 65. That’s 4.7 million people. “Nobody has answers,” Carole said. nj.com “It’s an equal access issue. She’s she a 1A first responder, and she’s at risk.” Carole was particularly perplexed at the two hospitals where the rescue squad transports the most patients – Overlook Medical Center in Summit, and University Hospital in Newark – told her Kelsey was not eligible, despite her presence in their hospitals. As of Thursday, the state’s COVID-19 dashboard indicated that 287,840 vaccinations had been administered and 47% of them have been Pfizer, however no one in the 16 to 17-year-old age group had received one, according to state statistics. Kevin Shea Our journalism needs your support. Please subscribe today to NJ.com. As of Thursday, the list the state maintains now shows the age eligibility for each facility, but only three sites show they can vaccinate a 16-year-old. Complicating matters, when facilities list that they have the vaccine, they do not specifically say if they have Pfizer, so showing up and hoping seems like a bad plan, she said. And calling them, forget it, she said. The list of sites to get vaccinated is currently over 100 and growing. Kevin Shea may be reached at kshea@njadvancemedia.com. Several other 16 and 17-year-olds work in EMS in Cranford, and other Union County towns, Carole said. Volunteers of local squads are often not even employees of the towns they serve, but of the squad organization, which are usually nonprofits. How they fall on a town’s radar for vaccinating first responders is unclear.center_img ___ (MCT) The work qualifies her to get the coronavirus vaccine, now, as an EMS member of Phase 1A. Kelsey is sometimes in or around the hospitals for up to an hour, delivering a patient, restocking and cleaning the ambulance, her mom said. (c)2021 NJ Advance Media Group, Edison, N.J. Last week, after four fruitless days on the phone and computer, she gave up and took the weekend off, while her daughter worked at the squad. “This is a problem,” Kelsey said. Kelsey is not even an EMT yet; she’s enrolled in a training course that starts in two weeks. She’s volunteering because she wants to be a nurse, she said. Because she’s a minor, her mom has been the main caller, but Kelsey is engaged in the search too. Kelsey Quinones is about as frontline of a healthcare worker as you can get. She volunteers with the Cranford First Aid Squad, working 12-hour weekend shifts responding to emergencies and often taking patients to area hospitals. Carole said she does not seek special treatment for Kelsey, and she understands the hierarchy of the phase system. While Kelsey attends high school, her mother Carole Quinones has been trying to get her daughter a vaccination appointment for well over a week now. “I feel like I’ve emailed a million people,” Carole said. “People have been super helpful, but nobody has Pfizer.” Visit NJ Advance Media Group, Edison, N.J. at www.nj.com It’s been a frustrating, dizzying swirl of emails and phone calls, none that have yielded answers, or an appointment. Carole believes her daughter and others teens who work in EMS, especially in volunteer squads, are a population overlooked by the state as it rolls out its COVID-19 vaccine process. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.last_img read more

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Claudia Hairston settles in at PA Library, which is still serving community despite shutdown

first_img “I have to say I was fortunate to experience various cultures. It added to me being more well rounded,” she said, adding some military brats do not like the constant moving just as they are getting used to a location.She was the opposite.“I developed an appreciation to experience different cultures and locations,” Hairston said. “It is very interesting to see things in movies and say ‘I’ve been there and saw that.’ It was a very unique upbringing.”Goals What would be considered normal library goals changed a bit with the pandemic. One goal is to open the doors as well as continue to get new books and add to the collection.“And with school right around the corner, we try to think of what we can do to support our Port Arthur Independent School District,” Hairston said. “There are still great things happening with the ultimate goal to reopen the doors.”Carolyn Thibodeaux, children’s librarian, called Hairston amazing.“She comes with a dynamic personality that’s approachable, not only in the public’s perspective but staff as well,” Thibodaux said. “From a children’s librarian point of view, I love her wisdom and I value the marketing skills she has for the library.”BackgroundHairston has a Bachelor of Science degree in Speech-Language Pathology from the University of Texas at El Paso and graduated summa cum laude from Texas Women’s University with a Master of Library Science degree.Prior to that she worked as the branch manager of the R.C. Miller Memorial Library in Beaumont, where she managed more than 160,000 titles a year. The doors to the Port Arthur Public Library may be temporarily closed but the newest hire, Claudia Hairston, and fellow employees are remaining busy making sure the facility continues its service to the community.The rise in COVID-19 cases is what led to the temporary closure of the facility, 4615 Ninth Ave., on July 13.But all is well inside as Hairston, who came on board as assistant director in May, took the reins from the retiring Jenniffer Hudson Connors.center_img And even though the doors are closed, work continues. The Summer Reading Program is in full force as requests for books are made and curbside pickup allows for the books to be brought home. As each child progresses week to week marking milestones, he or she receives “brag tags” — plastic tags that can be worn as a necklace or on their bookbag zipper.Claudia Hairston is the new assistant director of the Port Arthur Public Library. (Mary Meaux/The News)“We try to continue to post things on our Facebook page to keep our community engaged,” Hairston said of how staff is working toward goals given the novel coronavirus and limitations. “It has proven a challenge but also pushed us to think outside the box, so to speak, and get out of our comfort zone to provide services our patrons appreciate.”Hairston has been in Southeast Texas for approximately 12 years and grew up a military child. She has cross-crossed the U.S., living in various locations as well as spending nine years in Germany.last_img read more

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EB14: Fulcrum Gets Carbon Tubeless, Tubular Mountain Bike Wheels, Plus Alloy Models & Stealth…

first_imgWhile sister brand Campagnolo unleashed new top level carbon clinchers for the road, Fulcrum added them for the mountain. Along with carbon tubulars and new alloy clinchers, too. These come just one month after they introduced their latest top level alloy racing wheelset, the Red Power HP, and about two months after we spotted prototypes being tested by Merida Multivan. For road, they added a blacked out Nite version of their Racing Zero alloy wheels that promises better braking performance.The Red Carbon tubeless ready clinchers will be available in both 27.5″ and 29″ sizes with these subtle gray-on-black graphics. The rim is full carbon, and the hubs get carbon shells with alloy flanges built around a cup-and-cone bearing system. It’s all tied together with bladed, double butted stainless steel straight pull spokes. Weights are impressively light at just 1,356g for the 29er and 1,288g for 27.5″, thanks in part to a titanium freehub body.Roll on down for detail pics and more… Presumably, production versions will have a bit better finish inside the rim’s well. Notice there are no spoke holes? They insert the nipples through the valve stem hole then use magnets to guide them to each spoke hole on the inside edge. This leaves a clean interior that doesn’t need any rim tape to go tubeless. They say it also makes the rim stronger, which is further enhanced by the “Double Drop” ridged shape and asymmetric spoke drillings.The front wheel gets QR or 15mm thru axle options, the rear is QR or 12×142.The same hubs are used on both the clinchers and tubulars, with an XD Driver Body available for SRAM 1×11 groups.The Red Carbon Tubular mountain bike wheels also come in 29er and 27.5″ diameters, with weights of just 1,169g and 1,135g respectively. They also use 28 bladed straight pull spokes per wheels.Perhaps more impressive than the carbon wheels are the weights they’re able to achieve on the new Red Passion alloy mountain bike wheels. Both the 27.5 and 29er versions come in at just about 60-ish grams heavier, but likely at much better price points. They’re using the same hubs and spokes, but with a non-titanium freehub body. So, not all of the weight gain is at the rims.Fortunately, those rims are wide and very low profile, with a similar double-drop ridge shaping but with standard spoke holes so you’ll need to add tape to run tubeless. We’ve inquired about rim widths and will update as we can.The Racing Zero Nite is more than just a blacked out version of the standard model. It gets its inky appearance from a plasma electrolytic oxidation treatment that changes the surface structure of the aluminum to make it harder and more durable.They also gave the braking surface a new machined texture, which requires the use of carbon brake pads to maximize performance. The rims have varying heights for front (26mm) and rear (30mm). The lighter front rim improves handling while the stronger rear better lays down the power.Additional milling on the rims brings rotational weight down, putting the wheelset at just 1,428g. That’s with deep bladed spokes and an oversized drive side rear flange to improve power transfer. Front and rear hubs use their USB ceramic bearings.FulcrumWheels.comlast_img read more

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February 15, 2009 News and Notes

first_img Mitchell K. Karpf of Young, Berman, Karpf & Gonzalez has become chair-elect of the ABA Family Law Section. Stephen B. Gallagher of Marks Gray has been elected to the Jacksonville Navy League Board of Directors. Dan DeCiccio and Wayne Johnson of DeCiccio & Johnson in Winter Park recently presented an Adjuster Ethics Seminar at the Amerisure Insurance Company in St. Petersburg. Scott N. Richardson of Scott N. Richardson, P.A., participated as a visiting professor of law through the Center for International Legal Studies in Salzburg, Austria, teaching a course in American criminal law and procedure at Novosibirsk State University in Novosibirsk, Russia. Michael R. Blynn, a North Miami councilman, has been appointed to lead the National League of Cities’ University Communities Council for 2009. Joseph A. Peduzzi, a partner with Webb Peduzzi, P.A., with offices in Palm Beach Gardens and Orlando, was recently appointed to the City of West Palm Beach Criminal Justice Advisory Committee. Susan W. Stacy of Susan W. Stacy, P.L., presented “Identity Theft: What It Is, How It Happens and What to Do If It Happens to You” to the Annunciation Church Council of Catholic Women at its general meeting. Michael B. Colgan of Glenn Rasmussen Fogarty & Hooker in Tampa has been named a fellow of the Litigation Counsel of America. David M. Caldevilla of de la Parte & Gilbert in Tampa has his automotive artwork “Automotography” on display in the third floor lobby of the Bank of America Plaza Building in downtown Tampa through February 28. David G. Bates of Gunster in West Palm Beach has been appointed to the board of directors of the South Florida Tech Alliance. Trela J. White, attorney for the Village of Royal Palm Beach,was selected as the 2008 City Attorney of the Year by the Florida League of Cities. Anthony J. Fantauzzi III of Shutts & Bowen in Tampa was selected to join the Litigation Counsel of America Trial Lawyer Honorary Society. Christine D. Hanley of Christine D. Hanley & Associates, P.A., recently presented “The Devil We Know? The Devil We Don’t,” at the Florida Commission on Human Relations 2008 Florida Employment Law Conference. Richard Leigh of Swann & Hadley in Winter Park received the United Safety Council’s Jefferson Award for Public Service for 38 years of volunteer service with the council as a director, serving two terms as president, and general counsel. Barbara P. Richardson of Shutts & Bowen in West Palm Beach has been named to the board of directors of Vinceremos Therapeutic Riding Center. Bruce Bennett of Pathman Lewis in Miami has been named to the board of directors of the Beacon Council, which is charged with bringing new, job-generating investments to the community, while assisting existing businesses in their efforts to expand. Lara Donlon of The Law Office of Glen J. Torcivia and Associates in West Palm Beach was recently elected president of the Human Resources Association of Palm Beach County. Daniel E. Taylor of Tripp Scott has been installed as chair of the board for the Broward Partnership for the Homeless. David Lichter of Higer Lichter & Givner and Jerome Tabas of Tabas Mediation Services, Inc., recently presented a workshop titled “The Mediation Within the Mediation: Sources of Intra and Inter Party Conflict” at the Association of South Florida Mediators and Arbitrators Luncheon and Meeting in Ft. Lauderdale. Jessica Alhalel of Pathman Lewis in Miami has been selected to participate in the Leadership Development Institute, a program sponsored by The Network, the Greater Miami Jewish Federation’s Under 40 Connection. John L. Holcomb, with the firm Hill Ward Henderson in Tampa, has become president of the American Board of Trial Advocates, making him ABOTA’s first Florida president in its 50-year history. Peter Quinter and Caleb Sullivan of Becker & Poliakoff in Ft. Lauderdale presented an anti-dumping seminar at the Miami Free Zone on behalf of the Florida Customs Brokers and Forwarders Association. Ellen S. Morris of Elder Law Associates presented “Medicaid & Legislative Update” to the Palm Beach County Bar’s Elder Law Affairs Committee Seminar in West Palm Beach. Carlos A. Somoza of BDO Seidman presented an International Tax and Estate Tax Update at the annual Cuban American CPA Association conference in Coral Gables. Ramon de la Cabada of Miami was appointed by the Florida Supreme Court to serve on the Supreme Court Committee on Standard Jury Instructions for Criminal Cases. Alice Reiter Feld published an article on veterans’ benefits for the elderly and disabled in the Winter 2009 issue of Elder Law Attorney. Howard B. Lenard of North Miami Beach has been granted status of “City Attorney Emeritus” and the city renamed its law offices “The Howard B. Lenard, City Attorney Emeritus, Law Offices.” Glenn Klausman was honored at the Florida Justice Association Annual Founders Day Luncheon as the recipient of the 2008 “S. Victor Tipton Award” for legal writing and commitment to the cause of justice for the injured. Manuel A. Garcia-Linares of Richman Greer in Miami has become president-elect of the Cuban American Bar Association. David L. Glazer of Behar, Gutt & Glazer in Miami was a lecturer at the Miami-Dade Coalition on Aging 2008 Educational Conference held at Florida International University, on the topic of “Navigating the Medicare/Medicaid Maze.” Louise B. Zeuli of Louise B. Zeuli, P.A., was elected chair of the Seminole Community College Nursing Advisory Committee. She also was recently admitted to the Alternative Dispute Resolution roster for American Arbitration Association , b oth as a mediator and a member of AAA’s Commercial Arbitrators’ Panel and presented a seminar on “Titling Property: Does it Matter?” to the staff of Glickstein, Laval, Carris, an accounting firm in Maitland. James S. Werter of St. Augustine was elected a board member of the St. Augustine Airport Authority, Group 4. Spencer Aronfeld of Miami spoke in December at the 2008 Winter Ski Seminar for the Florida Justice Association at Beaver Creek, Colorado, on “Getting Punitive Damages in a Medical Malpractice Case.” Leslie J. Lott of Lott & Friedland in Coral Gables spoke at the Law Education Institute’s 26th Annual National Conference in Vail, Colorado, on the latest developments in trademark and trade dress law and recent federal court decisions. Scott Dibbs of Hill Ward Henderson in Tampa was recently reappointed vice chair of the Office Leasing Committee of the ABA’s Real Property, Trust & Estate Law Section. Timothy Daniel of Ormond Beach has been appointed to the board of directors of Cinematique of Daytona, a nonprofit organization sponsoring independent and foreign films in Volusia County. Peter Quinter of Becker & Poliakoff in Ft. Lauderdale was a lecturer at the American Conference Institute’s Advanced Forum on International Trade Commission Litigation in Washington, D.C. Andrew Winston of Lawlor, Winston & Justice in Ft. Lauderdale has been appointed to the Community Outreach Committee of the YMCA of Broward County, Sheinberg YMCA Family Center. Dennis Wall of Winter Springs and Orlando has written “CAT Claims: Insurance Coverage for Disasters” published online and in print by Thomson West Publishing Company. February 15, 2009 News and Notes February 15, 2009 News & Notescenter_img News and Noteslast_img read more

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Gophers swimmer Kierra Smith qualifies for Rio

first_imgGophers swimmer Kierra Smith qualifies for Rio Ben GotzApril 8, 2016Jump to CommentsShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via EmailPrintBy Mike HendricksonGophers swimmer Kierra Smith is headed to the 2016 Olympics.Smith, who did not swim with Minnesota this year to train, will represent Team Canada after qualifying in the 100-meter breaststroke.She swam a time of 1:06.93 in the event at Canada’s Olympic Trials on Thursday in Toronto, a time that would have placed her fourth in the 2012 Olympics.Smith’s qualifying time is 14th in the world rankings for the 100 breaststroke as of Friday morning. She told the Minnesota Daily in November the extra time she was devoting to swimming was helpful, and on Thursday it paid off as she punched her ticket to Rio.“I feel like I’ve had a lot of extra time to just focus on swimming, and I feel really relaxed going into practices, and I still feel really connected to the team, so I’ve really had a great year so far,” Smith said in November.Smith is a four-time individual Big Ten Champion and a three-time All-American, and will have one year of college eligibility left after competing this summer.“I think the biggest thing with [Smith] is her desire. She really wants to be the best, and she wants to be with the best, and I think her desire to get there is what makes her so good,” Gophers swimming and diving head coach Kelly Kremer said in November. “She’s willing to do whatever it takes and commit to the highest level, and it shows in all aspects of her athletic performance.”last_img read more

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Mindfulness-based stress reduction diminishes chemo brain

first_imgLinkedIn Participation in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program yields robust and sustained improvement in cancer-related cognitive impairment, a prevalent and potentially debilitating condition that affects attention, memory and executive function in survivors, according to a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine.Although cancer-related cognitive impairment, sometimes referred to as chemo brain or post-cancer cognitive fuzziness, is common among survivors — disrupting social relationships, work ability, self-confidence, and quality of life — clinicians have few treatment options to offer. Cognitive deficits have been seen to persist for more than a decade following cancer treatment for many survivors.“Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial of Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction for Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivors: Effects on Cancer-related Cognitive Impairment,” published online in advance of print in the Journal of Cancer Survivorship, is the first randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction, known as MBSR, on fatigued breast and colorectal cancer survivors, the majority of whom had been treated with chemotherapy. Share on Facebook In the study, MBSR participants reported significantly greater improvement in the ability to pay attention, and also made fewer mistakes on difficult cognitive tasks than those in the control group, which received patient education materials and supportive counseling. Both groups attended eight weeks of two-hour classes led by skilled facilitators.Retention rates in the trial exceeded 95 percent, strongly suggesting that participants found the program to be worthwhile. Previous studies by the Regenstrief-IU research group have found MBSR to have a positive impact on post-cancer fatigue, depression and sleep disturbance.Mindfulness training is thought to improve cognitive functioning through mechanisms of focused attention and non-reactive coping with one’s internal experiences, such as thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations. Programs in MBSR include a variety of meditation and yoga practices and other elements. These programs typically range in cost between $200 and $800 for an eight-week program, and are widely available in communities and over the Internet.Those who participated in the MBSR arm of the Regenstrief-IU study reported significant engagement with high rates of self-reported home practice of mindfulness techniques during the study. The majority continued to practice mindfulness throughout the six-month period following conclusion of the program.“More people than ever are surviving cancer due to the development of targeted and effective treatments,” said Shelley Johns, Psy.D., the clinical health psychologist and health services researcher who led the Regenstrief-IU study. “Yet many cancer survivors are living with difficult and persistent side effects of these treatments, which can be incapacitating.“Mindfulness meditation practices enable cancer survivors to better manage cancer-related cognitive impairment, reported by approximately 35 percent of cancer survivors who have completed treatment,” said Dr. Johns, who is a Regenstrief Institute investigator and assistant professor of medicine in the IU School of Medicine. “MBSR provides a creative solution for survivors whose social and occupational functioning may have been negatively impacted by cognitive difficulties.”While some oncologists provide patients with information on cancer-related cognitive impairment, the majority of clinicians do not address this symptom due to lack of evidence-based treatments for the condition according to Dr. Johns. Sharecenter_img Share on Twitter Pinterest Emaillast_img read more

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