Easy for Azan’s Peking Cruz

first_img NO MATCH PEKING CRUZ took on SIR BUDGET in a speed blitz and left his older rival standing at the top of the lane to easily win yesterday’s five-and-a-half furlongs overnight allowance sprint. Partnered by Panamanian Dick Cardenas, three-year-old PEKING CRUZ hooked up with six-year-old SIR BUDGET as the pair left the starting gate in a frenzy, setting splits of 22.4 for the first two furlongs. The battling speedsters raced clear of the field and turned for home with the Richard Azan-trained PEKING CRUZ looking more relaxed coming off the turn before accelerating in the stretch run to clock a quick 1:05.4 for the distance. SIR BUDGET was no match for PEKING CRUZ and weakened close home, relegated to fourth by POLLY B and GARY GLITTER, second and third, respectively. Trainer Ryan Darby and non-claiming apprentice Javaniel Patterson combined for a two-timer on the 10-race card – CAMOUFLAGE at 2-1 in the third and 13-1 upsetter, REASSURANCE in the fifth. Racing continues at Caymanas Park on Saturday.last_img read more

Read more →

This one’s for mom – Bennett dedicates Walker Cup win to principal and mother

first_imgHydel’s coach Corey Bennett dedicated the school’s first ISSA schoolboy football title to his mother and principal of the 25 year-old institution, Hyacinth Bennett. After a 2-0 victory over Excelsior in the Walker Cup final at Stadium East on Wednesday, the coach recognised the principal for her strong support and commitment to the team and players, and devoted their success to her. “It’s our 25th (year) anniversary so what a way (for the school) to celebrate. Mrs Bennett is at every match, all when we are playing practise matches and scrimmage. So we do this one for her, we really want to dedicate this one to her and the entire school community,” he said after the game. Meanwhile, the school principal said she envisioned the victory, as they had faith in attaining the victory, after the experience of being in a Manning Cup final in 2012. “I support sports (at Hydel) in general. But I want to give all glory and honour to Hydel’s master coach, the lord God almighty. Secondly to my son, Corey Bennett, the head coach and of course to Mr (Leebert) Haliman, the technical director and to Mr (Karumie) Huie, his assistant and of course a heartiest congratulation to the boys who gave it their best shot today (Wednesday),” she commented. “Remember in 2012 we went to the Manning Cup final, so it is not a new experience going to a final. But I believed we were going to come out on top, faith move mountains. This morning (Wednesday) at devotion we spoke about it (game) and prayed for them and we anticipated this (victory),” she added. Meanwhile, Corey Bennett, a former Manning Cup player himself with Wolmer’s Boys, hopes this first schoolboy football title will give the school a boost and be a catalyst for more success.  “We just hope this one can be a catalyst going forward. We are going through some tough times at the school and we are hoping this one can help the school uplift.  We hope more boys in the school will believe that once you have structure and discipline you can achieve goals. We only had five on the bench because of (in)discipline, so we are hopeful that can help others and help turn things around for the school,” he said.last_img read more

Read more →

Giving ‘Full’ backing! – Former national striker urges more support for Girlz

first_imgFormer national striker Ricardo Fuller says that corporate Jamaica and the Government should give all possible financial support to the senior national women’s team for them to have the best possible chance of doing well in the World Cup in France next year. The ex-Stoke City star is impressed by what he sees as growth in the women’s game in Jamaica and said that it was no surprise that the Reggae Girlz qualified. “I watched one game (live). I went to the stadium, and to be honest, I wasn’t thinking much of it, but when I got there, I loved it. I haven’t watched much women’s football, but I never expected it to be so exciting. There was even the full blowing of horns like it was the men playing. I was shocked even though I knew that at this level, it should be like this. But having not seen it before and to go and actually watch it, trust me, it wasn’t much different from the men, and now I know why they qualified,” he surmised. “They ended up qualifying for the final round, and now, they have qualified (for the World Cup), but I read the papers recently and heard them complaining about finances again. But we should just get behind the Girlz like they got behind the Boyz in ’98 when all these companies sponsored players. MAKE PLAYERS COMFORTABLE “We had a programme where individual players were sponsored by different companies, so we need to put back these things in place. It is important. For players to perform at their best, they have to be comfortable. They have nothing to worry about except concentrating solely on football. “So the best chance for them to do well in France is to support them financially, physically, psychologically, in every way, and we will have a better chance of doing well with the females in France,” he reasoned. Sports Minister Olivia Grange recently announced plans to give the team a belated celebration parade. But Fuller believes it is too late to capture the euphoria of that qualification moment. He thinks they should use the parade as a send-off to France for the Girlz, and this, he says, would boost confidence and morale going into the finals. “They should have done it shortly after the qualification, but it could be a blessing in disguise,” he said. “So they must do it just before they fly off. Show them the love. Give them the energy going into the start of the tournament. You never did it that time, so you have to do it smartly now. Do it just before they leave for the tournament to improve their confidence, and show them that we are behind them. I think that’s the way to do it. That will help them uplift their morale, and that is very important,” he said.last_img read more

Read more →

Sevilla, Villarreal, Genk advance in Europa

first_img Eight teams knocked out of the Champions League – Benfica, Club Brugge, Galatasaray, Inter Milan, Napoli, Shakhtar Donetsk, Valencia and Viktoria Plzen – also qualified for the round of 32 by finishing in third in their groups. The draw for the round of 32 will be held on Monday, an hour after the Champions League draw is held. Chelsea failed to keep a perfect record, but Willian and Olivier Giroud salvaged a 2-2 draw against Vidi by scoring from free kicks. ELIMINATED TEAMS Sevilla, Villarreal and Genk qualified for the knockout rounds of the Europa League yesterday, the final night of group-stage matches. Rapid Vienna, Malmo, Krasnodar, Rennes and BATE also advanced. Sevilla advanced from Group J after a 3-0 win over Krasnodar, which also advanced. Villarreal defeated Spartak Moscow 2-0 to progress from Group G with Rapid, which scored in the 84th minute to win 1-0 and knock out Rangers. Genk cruised to the next phase with a 4-0 rout of Sarpsborg in Group I, and Malmo also made it with a 1-0 away victory over Besiktas. Rennes’ new coach, Julien Stephan, celebrated a 2-0 victory in Group K and a spot in the next round by knocking out Astana. Arsenal, Bayer Leverkusen, Chelsea, Dinamo Zagreb, Dynamo Kiev, Eintracht Frankfurt, Fenerbahce, Lazio, Real Betis, Salzburg, Sporting, Zenit and Zurich already booked their places in the round of 32 earlier in the competition.last_img read more

Read more →

“Moulin Rouge” @ 704 on Old Year’s Night

first_imgAs the world prepares to usher in the New Year, Guyanese partyholics are expected to have a blast either at home or at their favourite entertainment spot. However, the best place to be is definitely 704 Lounge for “Moulin Rogue”, the ultimate Old Year’s party.Shirtless bow tie bartenders, aerial dancers, seductive servers and most of all, Trinidad’s most versatile deejay, Marcus Williams, will be there to make sure that the New Year is well received.Apart from all the excitement, Gregory from Karma Band will be in the house to add that special touch to the evening’s proceedings. In addition, there will be Krystal Kayne and P Star Perry, Doctor Dominic and others to add that saucy touch that will defiantly send the crowd wild. Patrons will also receive free sprinkles and goodies upon entry.VIP tickets for “Moulin Rouge” cost $15,000 while regular tickets will cost $5000 and are available at 704; Gismoz/Glamour; That Look Boutique and Pulse Online Shopping, South Road, Georgetown. The event is promoted by Pulse Entertainment and 704 Lounge.last_img read more

Read more →

“Behold!” – A spectacular display of dance, songs, drama and poetry for NCC

first_imgWorship In Spirit and in Truth (WIST) Ministries International Inc ushers in the season with “Behold!”; its fifth annual Christmas production scheduled for Saturday evening at the National Cultural Centre at 19:00h.This year’s theme – “Behold” – emphasises Christ, the gift of salvation, healing, deliverance and a symbol of hope for all mankind. Come and witness a spectacular display of dance, song, drama and poetry. It’s the perfect Christmas event for the entire family.In 2013, the board of WIST decided to host their first Christmas production. Ms Sandia Ramnarine, the founder of WIST, said: “Churches often shy away from the Christmas themed concerts.” So, to keep the spirit of Christmas alive, the team gathered 13 skilled dancers and the magnificent tradition was brought to life and has now grown to performances by more than 50 students.For the past 16 years, WIST has been contributing positively towards the lives of young people across Guyana through the performing arts, with dance being a specific focus.Latisha Davidson, a member of WIST since 2015, said it has been a “life changing experience,” and she has no regrets, adding “WIST has opened me up, helped me find myself, WIST has given me a family I never knew I needed.” WIST’s impact is evidential since the company was recognised this year by the Ministry of the Presidency and is the proud recipient of this year’s National Youth Award.Every year, WIST hosts charitable events in aid of various care homes and individuals in need. At Christmas, the proceeds from the production are donated to a selected home. In the past, WIST has given to the Ruimveldt Children’s Home and Care Centre, Carib Kids International and Hararuni Girls Home.This year, WIST will be giving to the Cheshire Home for Spastic Children (a home for disabled and autistic children) located at Unity, Lancaster Village, East Coast Demerara.With every purchase of a $1000 or $1500 ticket, patrons will not only be enriched on Saturday evening but will also be impacting the lives of those at Cheshire Homes.Tickets are available at WIST Ministries International; the National Cultural Centre; Roxie’s Fashion; Fon Roje; and Pinnacle Business Services, located in the Giftland Mall.last_img read more

Read more →

Looking for happiness…

first_img…in rum?There was a long disquisition in the papers recently of the dangers of demon rum.Rum has always been a two-edged sword in Guyana. As a by-product from the manufacture of sugar, it provided employment to workers on the plantation and revenues that supplemented sugar sales. But on the other hand, introduced to the workers to drown their sorrows – especially after slavery when they HAD money to pay for it, it became an addiction.There’s no question alcohol consumption in Guyana is legion. And if measured, might just be another one of those dubious qualifications that give us world rankings. Like so many habits inculcated on the plantations, it became part of the “way of life” of those that came out of it.One interesting feature is since the African slaves were only given rum at the “crop over” period in celebration – they don’t in general imbibe at the level of the descendants of the East Indian indentureds.In fact, with the latter group in present-day Guyana – and Trinidad for that matter – “Rum” forms the most dominant topic of song and dance. One wonders if the fella that crooned the hit “Rum till I die” saw the irony of what was the denouement of rum drinking. Among folks in different cultures that imbibe alcohol, there are two approaches that produce completely different behavioural patterns in the imbibers.There are the Mediterranean drinkers – like the Italians – who consume alcohol as part of their culinary repertoire. In total they may consume as much alcohol as others but generally do not resort to violence when they get “high”. They’re “pleasant”.The other type of drinkers – and the Guyanese Indians fall into this category – they drink to get drunk. And when in that state get violent. And this is one of the objectionable features of rum-drinking in Guyana with its association with domestic and interpersonal violence that the disquisition objected to.But the point your Eyewitness – who’s a “social drinker” who’s never resorted to violence – wants to make is, there’s no ineluctable connection between drinking alcohol and violent behaviour. The latter is culturally mediated.So for those who would abolish alcohol – they need to look at the prior cultural patterns that lead to violence and other objectionable behaviour in some groups.…till 2 o’clock in the marnin’The “Rum till I die” ditty signals what some folks think is the purpose of alcohol for those that abuse it and destroy their liver and brains: they’re committing slow suicide.Now on the sugar plantations, one could understand the frustration created in folks who were dragged from their tight-knit villages in India and now forced to struggle against an oppressive system on their own. Strangers in a strange land who can’t take it no mo’.But what is it today? Are the conditions of their existence in modern-day Guyana still lead them into a state of hopelessness that make them fall back on rum to numb their nerves? These are questions that should be looked into rather than banning rum shops and bars from serving alcohol past 2am.With all the interventions that educate folks about behaviour that leads to self-destructive results – like, say, AIDS…couldn’t ministries like social services, public security, communities, etc get together and launch something to discourage violence-related drinking?Or do we need a CoI?…in all the wrong placesThey say if you want to help an addict, remove him from environments that facilitate the addiction. But the government’s -past and present – are licensing rum shops in every nook and cranny.Where are self-destructive and violent drunks to go?last_img read more

Read more →

A major reason for Guyana losing its manufacturing sector

first_imgSome wise person once said for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.  The mismanagement of the energy sector since independence has been responsible in the main for the economic erosion within our manufacturing sector.  In 1973, Guyana was spending about US$500 million on fuel imports during the energy crisis and to his credit, Mr Burnham at that time did promise the people that he will build a large hydropower plant in the Upper Mazaruni.  The rest is history! That promise moved from a Guyanese hydropower plant to a Guyanese giant hydrocele with a huge amount of debt and nothing to show for it.  By 1984 when Burnham finally surrendered to the reality, over G$1 billion was squandered and any plan for an aluminium smelter was shelved, burying Linden’s economic fortunes in the process.UNDP did an extensive study on the hydropower potential in Guyana, but the closest Guyana ever got to unleashing that potential was the Amaila Falls Hydro Project under Mr Jagdeo, which has now been thoughtlessly abandoned by this Granger regime in exchange for a half-baked energy strategy that continues to hinder human development.In addition to the underperformance in the energy sector, the prevalence of low-cost Chinese made goods, most of which can be made in Guyana, is a major inhibitor to the growth in the manufacturing sector.  China has been able to manipulate its currency; employ children on the cheap (not follow standard labour practices); destroy the environment and cut corners on quality to get ahead to the disadvantage of Guyana, who cannot do the same because of the international rules.  Collectively, these two reasons are stagnating the manufacturing sector.Whenever a manufacturing facility closes its door, it leaves a black hole.  Everything that supports that factory goes down with it.  Guyanese jobs disappear, local people who supply that factory with materials, equipment, maintenance services and then all the other services around it like the markets, they all go down with that factory.This is exactly what has happened to the Mon Repos Market based on a video I saw from CN Sharma on his “Voice of the People” programme in January 2018.  The overwhelming consensus of the vendors was that “money nah circulating”.  With the Enmore Factory mothballed by this Granger regime at the end of 2017, some 40,000 people along the East Coast of Demerara were directly and indirectly affected in their pockets.  The same experiences have been experienced on the West Demerara and in the Corentyne. People have mortgages/rent to pay and they have to put food on the table.  Just meeting these two basic needs will become impossible for thousands of families if some of these sugar factories are not re-opened in private hands within the next six months.  As the experience from the bauxite industry revealed, severance money can only last so long especially when they are getting less than G$500,000.In any country, the bricks and mortar associated with success are the agriculture, mining, housing, and manufacturing sectors.  On all four fronts, the policies of this Granger regime have directly contributed to the active destruction of these sectors with some respite in the mining sector.  It is these sectors that make Guyana tick, and it is unfortunate that the members of Team Granger are not empathetic to this fact.So coming back to the ordinary market vendors in the Mon Repos Market, no policymakers should take their comments lightly.  It is a sure way of testing the pulse of the economy and progressive public policies must be crafted urgently to recalibrate the economy.This brings me to a pertinent point – imports. Pigeon peas in a tin?  Give me a break!  Now can you understand why the economy is stifling?  The world has unrestricted access to the Guyanese market and continues to flood it with their products.  Unfortunately, because of our high cost and unreliable electricity and an unresponsive government investment policy, Guyana has restricted access to the world market.  This is an uneven relationship and must be addressed. All the signs are pointing to the fact that more factory closures in the manufacturing sector are set to happen unless President Granger and his team act now and fast!last_img read more

Read more →

Picking sense…

first_img…from PNC’s nonsenseYour Eyewitness still can’t get over the PNC’s barefacedness on our Constitution over the consequences of the NCM. And it’s not that they didn’t know beforehand about those consequences. After the 2011 elections the PNC and AFC had those same 33 seats they got in 2015 – which constituted a parliamentary majority. It’s only because our Constitution doesn’t allow a coalition AFTER the elections, that they weren’t allowed to name the President and form the Government!!So lo and behold, in 2014, Moses Nagamootoo of the AFC (obviously with the tacit approval of the PNC/APNU) cited Art 106 (6) and moved a no-confidence motion (NCM) against the PPP Govt of Donald Ramotar. No one in the PPP cried “dirty pool!” – after all NCMs are a regular feature of parliamentary democracies! In fact when the PPP brought THEIR NCM in 2018, Moses Nagamootoo gloated that the PPP had “cogged” the formulation of HIS motion!!At no time did the PNC say the NCM wasn’t democratically kosher. In fact, PNC GS Amna Ally famously taunted the PPP in Parliament, “Bring it on, big boy!!” But when the PPP did “bring it on”, after loud wails of “Noooo, Charrandas. Nooooooooo!!!” the PNC has been trampling all over the Constitution to prevent themselves from being booted out by the sovereign Guyanese people. First, it was Charrandas was a dual citizen and his vote didn’t count!! That was thrown out by the High Court; the Appellate Court and the CCJ!!Then they claimed even if the vote counted, 33 wasn’t the majority of 65 – as it had been since 2011!! They’d bought a snake oil concoction that the requisite process to arrive at that claim – dividing MPs into halves and then reconstituting them again – hadn’t been performed!! The High Court threw that rigmarole into the wastebasket, but two justices of the Appellate Court went along for the ride!! They’ve to be hiding their faces after the CCJ derided the half-man abomination!!So with their backs against the (constitutional) wall, the PNC’s fallen back on their plan B – counting on GECOM – controlled by their unilaterally appointed chair – to drag out the elections date  till next year!! Now what’s the point of the Constitution, if it can dictate the elections be held in three months after an NCM but GECOM can simply snicker, “No way, Jose!!”?? The law may be an ass, but not our Constitution!GECOM’s been sitting on their hands since Dec because of Granger’s Chair’s intransigence and they cannot now be allowed to cite Art 162 (2) – to delay elections because of “hardship”.This was brought on by themselves!!…from the PNC’s white noiseThe PNC’s demanding new House-to-House (HtH) Registration – but interestingly, THERE’S ABSOLUTELY NO LAW that supports this demand!!! That’s right!! In 1967, a National Register of Registrants (NRR) from which the Preliminary List of Electors (PLE) is extracted was established from HtH registration. Subsequently, because of PNC’s electoral jiggery pokery over the next two decades, a new NRR was created in time for the 1992 elections registration. But because of the improvement and computerisation of records (such as of deaths) after 2000, the goal was to institutionalise “Continuous Registration” by automatically adding names of persons 14 or older (who are exhorted at scheduled intervals) and eliminating those dead from lists provided by the General Registry Office.The last HtH registration was in 2008, and as the OL pointed out, there have been two general elections where the PNC didn’t find anyone disenfranchised!! If someone’s not on the list for whatever reason, they can simply have that rectified during the Claims and Objections Period!!Don’t get confused by the PNC’s white noise!! …from urbanityWith English-instilled understatement, Senior Counsel Douglas Mendes for the Opposition Leader allowed to the CCJ that he “is YET TO BE SHOWN any law for HtH registration”. And allowed Basil Williams meanderings on HtH.The PNC don’t know urbanity: “Shut up or put up, Basil!!”last_img read more

Read more →

The Clash of Civilisations?

first_imgA quarter of a century ago, Harvard’s Samuel Huntington unfurled his “Clash of Civilisations” thesis which seemingly became the working model for western, especially US, foreign policy strategists. In the wake of the fall of the Iron Curtain in 1989 and the end of the Cold War, the timing was maybe more than just fortuitous. After all he was also part of the US think tank that had conjured up the “modernisation” thesis after WWII that became the western blueprint to win the hearts and minds of the Third World in the Cold War that had just been declared.It would seem that Huntington has proven to be a prophet. As the book’s blurb explained, Huntington predicts not only how clashes between civilisations are the greatest threat to world peace but also how an international order based on civilisations is the best safeguard against war. More specifically, as ideological distinctions among nations during the Cold War have been replaced by cultural differences, world politics has been reconfigured. Across the globe, new conflicts – and new cooperation – have replaced the old order of the Cold War era.It might very well be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Huntington postulated “how the population explosion in Muslim countries and the economic rise of East Asia are changing global politics. These developments challenge Western dominance, promote opposition to supposedly “universal” Western ideals, and intensify inter-civilisation conflict over such issues as nuclear proliferation, immigration, human rights, and democracy. The Muslim population surge has led to many small wars throughout Eurasia, and the rise of China could lead to a global war of civilizations.Huntington offers a strategy for the West to preserve its unique culture and emphasises the need for people everywhere to learn to coexist in a complex, multipolar, multi-civilisational world.” It is argued by Huntington that the Western movement for Universalism will only lead to confrontation with non-western cultures. Western Universalism is advocacy of western values including democracy, freedom of speech, and human rights in an attempt to universalise them throughout the world.One reason that this promulgation of “universalistic” values may be destabilising is that while some who preach such “universalism” may be benign, others may not be of like mind. The latter movements, such as the “religious freedom” disguise propagation of fundamental Christianity through proselytising people of other religions and cultures can alienate them from their native cultures. They can also teach them to berate their native cultures although many may not have even comprehended the new values. There is resistance in the world against alienating people from their native cultures and weakening integrity of the races.The main issue with Huntington’s thesis, however, is his conflating of Christianity with modernity. It goes against the history of church and development of modernism in Europe. Modern advances in sciences and scientific and even industrial development as well as every modern intellectual thought came by resisting the influence of Christianity. Science and Church stand opposite to one another in modernisation. It must be accepted that almost every culture/religion can modernise without having to westernise. It is from this perspective, for instance, we must view the changes that are sweeping the Islamic world. The resurgence of the Islamicists as not definitionally “non-modern”.Finally, there can be universalism not of the kind advocated by the fanatics. The West pushed its form of universalism as the basis of human rights protection through non-State organisations. It is possible to conceive of Universalism based on Scientific Humanism and accepting the best of all cultures on a rational basis. This is what Mahatma Gandhi meant when he called himself a Hindu, a Muslim and also a Christian, not that there is such a cult that integrates a composite of all three. What made man “Human” are the innate instincts of kindness, tolerance, mutual love and sense of fairness inherent in all human beings, prior to the birth of all of “religions”.It is unfortunate that the Trump presidency is pandering even more single-mindedly to Huntington’s thesis.last_img read more

Read more →