Arcade Fire Plan To Open A Restaurant

first_imgArcade Fire husband and wife Win Butler and Régine Chassagne have announced plans to expand their talents to the culinary field, opening up a Haitian restaurant in Montreal. The new establishment, Agrikol, will open this summer.The new venture is a collaboration with Roland Jean and Jen Agg, owners Toronto’s The Black Hoof and Rhum Corner. The unique concept will feature a music and art space, as well as authentic foods and flavors.Chassagne is of Haitian origin, and the band has worked to raise several million dollars for the country in recent years.The Globe and Mail further explains, “Featuring Haitian cuisine, music and visual arts, the space will build on the cultural advocacy work that Chassagne and Butler have demonstrated since Montreal-based Arcade Fire started raising funds for Haiti in 2005. For Agg and the Haitian-born Jean (who is also a painter), it will be a chance to take their signature, convivial restaurant style beyond Toronto’s Dundas Street West.”“The idea is that it’s a cultural space,” continues Butler. “The thing that we were really impressed with at Rhum Corner is that it’s this space for Haitian and Caribbean culture and it’s really cool and contemporary.”As for the food, Agg describes it as “slightly differently, but the food and flavours are really authentic. It’s going to be fun because there is just a much larger [Haitian] community [in Montreal], so we have access to ingredients that we don’t have in Toronto.” [Via Eater]last_img read more

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Joe Gibbs Racing enjoys historic, emotional 1-2-3 finish in Daytona 500

first_img00:0000:0000:00LIVEFacebookTwitterEmailEmbedSpeedNormalAutoplay For Hamlin, it was his second time winning the Daytona 500 — the first was in 2016 in a razor-close finish against Martin Truex Jr. — and it ended a winless drought that stretched back to the 2017 Southern 500. The Daytona 500 victory also came on the same day that Hamlin’s crew held up a sign in tribute to another No. 11, J.D. Gibbs, the beloved co-chairman of JGR who passed away a little more than a month ago.RELATED: JGR pit crews, team honor J.D. GibbsOwner Joe Gibbs was overcome with emotion during his post-race interview with FOX as he tried to put in to words what the victory and 1-2-3 finish meant to him and the team.“What happened right here, J.D.’s name is on that car,” Joe Gibbs said. “That’s his No. 11 with Denny, he found Denny. I’m just saying what happened here was emotional for all of us, the family. Denny racing like he did right there is unbelievable.”Jones was almost the forgotten man of the podium sweep, having gotten swept up in an on-track incident previously. But Jones kept his car (mostly) clean when the “Big One” – and then others – erupted around him, then steered through the carnage late when Joey Logano and Michael McDowell didn’t quite get their Fords hooked up late.“I couldn’t really tell how bad (the damage) was at the time, but it’s just such a ‑‑ it’s such a race here of just perseverance,” Jones said. “I mean, you get down to those last 20 laps, I knew there was probably going to be another wreck. “But getting down to the end, at one point I was like, well, there’s only 14 cars left, I might as well just go race now. You’ve just got to stick with it. I mean, this is the one track where you can have quite a bit of damage and still get up there and contend, and that’s what kept me going, knowing we were still going to be in it and be able to finish.” 00:0000:0000:00LIVEFacebookTwitterEmailEmbedSpeedNormalAutoplay Hamlin explained that the No. 18 team asked his group to work together on the final restart, and the way the field was stacked, the Virginia native thought it made sense in that instance.“Our original deal was inside 10 to go, after that you kind of race,” Hamlin said. “We kept going. I think we had a restart with seven or eight to go, we worked together, and … I think they asked and we said, ‘Let’s just race it out.’ So that put us in a good position.“(For the last restart), I think they came to my spotter and said, ‘Hey, do you want to drop down in front of us, we’re open to do that,’ and when I saw him and the 22 (of Joey Logano) lined up, I was like, ‘Well, absolutely, sure. Definitely we’ll do that.’ I thought that was the best move for us, but it still gave him a great opportunity to win because he got a great run on us on the backstretch and we had to block it.” They got there after a frenzied finish that saw multiple wrecks, two red flags and Hamlin and Busch swapping the lead in between a pair of late-race restarts.RELATED: Hamlin wins Daytona 500 | Hamlin’s rise in NASCARThe two Joe Gibbs Racing veterans communicated through their own personal teams via scanner to orchestrate the final laps. The result of that left Hamlin exuberant in Victory Lane and Busch looking devastated on pit road.“It’s first and foremost to try to make sure that we at least get a JGR car to Victory Lane,” Busch said of the final few laps. “(The 11 car) didn’t want to do it the previous restart, but then since he got the lead, he wanted to do it again (at the end). “You know, it is what it is. At least we got a JGR car in Victory Lane. That’s the big picture. That’s what matters, and we move on.”center_img DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Joe Gibbs Racing not only won the 61st annual Daytona 500 with driver Denny Hamlin, but teammates Kyle Busch and Erik Jones also made it a 1-2-3 sweep of the top positions by finishing right behind Hamlin’s No. 11 FedEx Toyota. It was the first time a team swept the top three positions in the Daytona 500 since Hendrick Motorsports accomplished the feat in 1997 with Jeff Gordon, Terry Labonte and Ricky Craven. 00:0000:0000:00LIVEFacebookTwitterEmailEmbedSpeedNormalAutoplay 00:0000:0000:00LIVEFacebookTwitterEmailEmbedSpeedNormalAutoplaylast_img read more

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House poised to pass prevailing wage for state construction

first_imgby Hilary Niles vtdigger.org Vermont’s union roots are shallow at best when it comes to construction and building trades. It’s estimated that less than 10 percent of the state’s construction workers belong to a union.Legislation up for a final vote in the House on Thursday wouldn’t change that, but it would push companies toward a union business model when it comes to paying for labor on state-funded construction projects.H.878 would require companies to offer certain benefits if they want to bid on state jobs. Alternatively, companies that don’t offer benefits could boost employee wages for an amount equal to the value of what their benefits otherwise would be. The bill would accomplish all this by shifting Vermont’s prevailing wage laws from a unique state model to a federal standard. “Prevailing wage” refers to standards for how much construction workers should be paid on publicly funded projects.Rep. Mary Hooper, D-Montpelier. Photo by Roger Crowley/for VTDiggerRep. Mary Hooper, D-Montpelier, sits on the House Corrections and Institutions Committee, one of three House panels that recommended H.878.“This was about what sort of employers do we want to be,” Hooper said on the House floor Wednesday. “Paying Vermonters decent wages and enabling them to purchase decent benefits. That’s the underlying concept of this bill,” she said.Rep. Warren Van Wyck, R-Ferrisburgh, cast one of two dissenting votes in the House General Services, Housing and Military Affairs Committee. Van Wyck said after the floor debate that he dislikes the way the bill proscribes employment practices, and he believes non-union shops have more flexibility to find efficiencies.A key to that flexibility, the trade group Associated General Contractors of Vermont argues, is employee benefits. Companies can choose whether, when and how many benefits to offer all or some employees.All federally funded projects must follow rates set by the Davis Bacon and Related Acts. About 40 states have their own prevailing wage laws for state-funded construction.Vermont’s current prevailing wage laws neither require benefits nor calculate their value into standards for compensation. The federal prevailing wage law does.The switch to Davis-Bacon standards would mean that, in order to compete for any state-funded contracts, construction companies would have to offer benefits to their workers or else pay them extra.That would drive up labor costs for companies that do not offer federally recognized benefits. These businesses have fought the bill.Union and non-union shops that do offer benefits have praised the legislation. They say it will “level the playing field,” making it easier to compensate workers well.The legislation started as a proposal to establish the going union rates as Vermont’s prevailing wage, similar to laws in Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania.After some time in the House General Services Committee, that union-wage legislation was shelved and a new committee bill was created to align Vermont with the federal prevailing wage. Connecticut and Rhode Island tie their projects to Davis-Bacon rates.The potential impact of the switch on Vermont’s capital budget is unclear. A fiscal note dated April 3 estimates an 8 percent increase in total project costs. That could be anywhere from $1.92 million to $3.36 million annually — down from a previous estimate in March of $2 million to $7 million.Most years, Vermont’s capital budget ranges between $60 million and $70 million. Only about half of those projects are subject to prevailing wage requirements, and labor constitutes roughly one-third of the spending.Rep. Thomas Koch, R/D-Barre, said more money won’t be added to the capital bill to pay for the increased labor costs, so the prevailing wage change just represents projects that won’t get done.“The money isn’t going to come from the contractors. They’re going to write it into their bids. And the money doesn’t come from the state treasury,” Koch said. “It comes from the taxpayers. So all we’re doing is transferring from one taxpayer to another. Some will say, ‘thank you,’ and some will say, ‘ouch.’”Hooper said the Institutions Committee gave the potential for increased costs a lot of thought.“We protect that capital bill very vigorously,” Hooper said. The majority of the committee decided any increase in labor costs would be worth the money.The House Appropriations Committee voted for the bill 7 to 4. The bill is scheduled for a final House vote Thursday morning. It’s uncertain which Senate committee would take it up.last_img read more

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UVM, Albany College of Pharmacy to offer dual degree program

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences – Vermont Campus,The Colchester, Vermont, campus of the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.Vermont Business Magazine The University of Vermont and Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences have signed an affiliation agreement to provide eligible students with an opportunity to earn a bachelor’s degree from UVM and a doctor of pharmacy degree (Pharm.D.) from ACPHS in a total of seven years. Students seeking both of these degrees typically require eight years to complete the academic requirements of the two programs.The terms of the agreement are effective beginning with students commencing their undergraduate study at UVM in the current academic year (2017-18), with the earliest anticipated matriculation at ACPHS in the fall of 2020. Through this arrangement, UVM students may seek admission to the “3+4” program at the conclusion of their first year of study at the university. If accepted into the program, students will attend UVM for three years and then enroll at the ACPHS Colchester campus for their final four years of study.Students in the 3+4 program will earn their bachelor’s degree from UVM upon satisfactory completion of their first year at ACPHS. Students will subsequently earn their doctor of pharmacy degree from ACPHS after meeting all of the remaining requirements of the Pharm.D. program. The Pharm.D. is the entry level degree required today to become a pharmacist in the United States.“Since opening our Colchester campus in 2009, the University of Vermont and the UVM Medical Center have been great partners of the College,” said Greg Dewey, president of Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. “We look forward to broadening our relationship through this agreement which will provide qualified UVM students with a clear pathway to a doctor of pharmacy degree, while allowing them to remain in the area and continue enjoying all that northwest Vermont has to offer.”“This agreement opens a promising new pathway for our undergraduate students to a rewarding professional career,” said Tom Sullivan, University of Vermont president. “The Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences has been a great partner in the past; we look forward to expanding our collaboration and to the exciting new opportunities our students will benefit from as a result.” Pharmacists have long enjoyed excellent earning potential and job security, and recent developments in both the profession and the health care system indicate that will continue. The past decade, in particular, has seen a significant expansion of the pharmacist’s role in patient care through the delivery of services that include immunizations, health and wellness testing, management of chronic diseases, and medication therapy management. The expanding scope of practice has also resulted in opportunities for pharmacists in non-traditional settings such as physician offices, ambulatory care clinics, and managed care organizations, further underscoring the increased role that pharmacists are expected to play in helping meet the nation’s health care needs.About the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Founded in 1881, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences is a private, independent institution with a long tradition of academic and research excellence. The College opened its Colchester campus in 2009, and it remains the only pharmacy program in the state of Vermont. For more information, please visit www.acphs.edu(link is external).About the University of Vermont Since 1791, the University of Vermont has worked to move humankind forward. Today, UVM is a Public Ivy and top 100 research university of a perfect size, large enough to offer a breadth of ideas, resources, and opportunities, yet small enough to enable close faculty-student mentorship across all levels of study, from Bachelor’s to M.D. programs. Here, students’ educational experience and activities are enriched by our location — from the energy and innovation of Burlington to the forests, farms, and independent spirit of Vermont. UVM provides students endless ways to explore the world, challenge ideas, and dig in on the most pressing issues of our time.Source: UVM 9.27.2017VBM vermontbiz.comlast_img read more

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Permanent Fund announces finalists for 2017 Early Educator of the Year

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The Permanent Fund for Vermont’s Children is pleased to announce the finalists for the third annual Early Educator of the Year Award, which recognizes and celebrates early educators who have gone above and beyond to positively impact the lives of children, and have been a valuable resource for families. The 2017 Early Educator of the Year finalists are: Cheryl “Cookie” Danyow, of Addison, and Ellen Kraft, of Richmond.Both finalists will be honored at the Vermont Association for the Education of Young Children (VAEYC) Annual Conference on Thursday, October 12th at the Killington Grand Hotel, where one will be named the Early Educator of the Year and receive $5,000 and all expenses paid to attend the 2018 VAEYC conference as well as one national conference. The runner-up will receive $1,000 and all expenses paid to attend the 2018 VAEYC conference.Cheryl “Cookie” Danyow, owner of Mountain Road Preschool in Addison, has been working with children for 30 years. She has both an indoor and an outdoor classroom and encourages children to explore nature and learn from their surroundings. “The philosophy of my program is to provide a safe, healthy, hands-on learning environment where children can learn and explore and expand at their own pace,” she said. “We always have a science area going. We’ve done the monarch butterflies, from caterpillars to butterflies — the children love it!”Ellen Kraft, owner of Honeycomb Kids in Richmond, said she wants children in her program to feel comfortable and safe to play and just be kids. “Play is everything to a kid. Play is how they move through the world,” she said. Kraft said she and her staff focus on being positive influences for the children in the program. “The adults, we are the curriculum. The kids take in everything that we do and they’re genetically engineered to copy that,” she said. “Making sure we are truly worthy of imitation is a huge part of what we do.”The Permanent Fund created the Early Educator of the Year Award to recognize and celebrate excellence in the teaching of Vermont’s young children to bring attention to the importance of high-quality early care and learning. Each year, the award alternates between honoring home-based providers and center-based providers.“Besides parents, early educators are the first teachers our children have and their work lays an important foundation at the most crucial time of development in our children’s lives,” said Permanent Fund CEO Aly Richards. “By honoring those who are doing great work, we are demonstrating to all Vermonters what high-quality early care and learning looks like.”The award selection committee is comprised of local leaders in Vermont’s early education field, including: Geralyn Barrows, 2015 Early Educator of the Year; Laurel Bongiorno of Champlain College; Kim Buxton of VAEYC; Chloe Learey of the Winston Prouty Center; Sheila Quenneville of the Vermont Child Care Providers Association; Betsy Rathbun-Gunn of Building Bright Futures; and Stacy Weinberger of the State Board of Education.About the Permanent Fund for Vermont’s Children Founded in 2000 by philanthropists Rick Davis and Carl Ferenbach, the Permanent Fund works to improve the quality of Vermont’s early care and learning system primarily through the support of two statewide initiatives: Let’s Grow Kids and Vermont Birth to Five. Using a collaborative philanthropic approach, the Permanent Fund works with other funders, non-profits, community leaders and policymakers to improve educational outcomes, build stronger communities and make a lasting difference in the lives of Vermont’s children. The Permanent Fund for Vermont’s Children is a supporting organization of the Vermont Community Foundation. For more information, visit www.permanentfund.org(link is external).last_img read more

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Virgin Sport San Francisco partnerships confirmed

first_imgJoining previously confirmed events (Oxford, Hackney and the British 10K Street Party) in the UK, Virgin Sport San Francisco gets under way this year on 14-15 October. This week, Virgin Group Founder Sir Richard Branson and Virgin Sport Global CEO Mary Wittenberg announced new partnerships for the ‘Festival of Fitness’ at Virgin Sport San Francisco.The following companies have all been confirmed as sponsor partners for the Bay Area event this October: wearable technology company Motiv, hydration product nuun, fitness membership platform ClassPass, organic and nutritious foods company Clif Bar and Headspace, ‘personal trainer for the mind and leader in meditation’.Virgin Sport San Francisco is one of Virgin Sport’s four events launching in 2017, with three additional events in the greater London area.Motiv, nuun, ClassPass, CLIF BAR and Headspace will join Virgin Sport’s Give Back partner Playworks and the event’s Official Performance Apparel and Footwear Partner, ASICS, to ‘create an experience that celebrates the sweat of sport with the swagger of Virgin’.Mary Wittenberg, Global CEO of Virgin Sport said “We are so excited to be teaming up with ASICS, Playworks, Motiv, Nuun, ClassPass, CLIF BAR, and Headspace – incredible groups who share our mission to encourage millions of people to live healthy lifestyles. We’re thrilled for them to join us for our first-ever Festival of Fitness in the US. Together, we can make challenge fun.”San Francisco will be Virgin Sport’s first US-based, weekend-long Festival of Fitness, and will begin on Saturday 14 October with the Twin Peaks Mile, a new, one-mile run up the peak, with ‘themed waves for costumes, teamwork, speed and bootcamp’. The weekend will culminate on Sunday 15 October with the Virgin Sport SF Bay Half Marathon, starting and finishing at City Hall.On Sunday, participants can workout at the Go Fit Yourself fitness village, which will offer diverse workout challenges for participants of all levels, led by top local instructors. Completing the Festival of Fitness atmosphere will be healthy local food, live music, art installations and more. Activations will be both free and paid, with ‘something for everyone including athletes, family and friends’.Motiv, a fitness-tracking ring, is the Official Wearable Technology Partner for Virgin Sport San Francisco. The device monitors users’ activity, heart rate and sleep and inspires users to live an active and healthy lifestyle. Motiv will host a Recharge booth at the Go Fit Yourself Fitness Village, providing Virgin Sport San Francisco Festival participants the opportunity to recharge both their phones and their bodies, with phone charging stations and foam-rolling classes. Motiv will also be hosting celebrity personal trainer Erica Stenz of Barry’s Bootcamp to lead a free class on the Go Fit Yourself stage.nuun, an electrolyte enhanced drink tablet, will quench the thirst of festival participants as the Official Electrolyte Partner of the SF Bay Half Marathon and Twin Peaks Mile. Refreshing thousands of attendees, nuun will hand out complimentary, reusable water bottles to SF Bay Half Marathon participants, and activate nuun Hydration Stations in the Go Fit Yourself Fitness Village as well as on the start and finish lines of the Twin Peaks Mile hill climb.ClassPass, a fitness membership platform that grants users access to a diverse offering of studios and gyms, will present the ClassPass Stage in the Fitness Village on Sunday 15 October. Five of the company’s local studio partners will lead 45 minute long exercise sessions including yoga, mat pilates, strength and abs, barre and dance.Clif Bar will be joining Virgin Sport San Francisco as the Official Energy Bar Partner for the festival. It will be providing Energy Stations on courses throughout the weekend, offering attendees a variety of nutritious and organic food products to fuel up for their fitness journeys.Headspace offers hundreds of guided meditations designed to help with everything from sleep to sports training. Headspace will be bringing a meditation experience to the festival with co-founder Andy Puddicombe leading a short, two-minute meditation for runners at the SF Bay Half Marathon starting line, marking ‘the world’s first pre-race group meditation’.Registration fees start at US$99 for the Virgin Sport SF Bay Half Marathon, and participants will be invited to make a donation for Virgin Sport’s local Give Back partner, Playworks, which is aiming to increase physical activity by ‘leveraging the power of safe, fun, and healthy play at school every day’.www.virginsport.com/event/san-francisco-2017 Relatedlast_img read more

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School board considers changes to process for electing president, vice president; looks to formalize expectations of members

first_imgShawnee Mission at-large board member Brad Stratton.The Shawnee Mission School District board of education is wrestling with the best approach for nominating and electing its president and vice president ahead of the state-mandated selecting of board officers next month.The issue arose as a sticking point last year, when at-large board member Brad Stratton voiced concern that the approach currently in place did not give board members a guaranteed opportunity to vote in favor of a candidate, and that it allowed a board member who would be campaigning for reelection to his or her seat to be serving as board president during the time he or she could be voted out of office.The process currently in place — which is not formally documented in any district policy manuals — allows board members to nominate candidates for the president and vice president roles, and then directs the board to vote on those nominations in the order they came in. So if the first person nominated for the president role has support from four or more board members, he or she would become the new president without any other candidates’ names coming up for a vote.Stratton argued during the board’s work session last week that a better approach would be for the board to cast ballots for all of the nominees at the same time, with each member getting one vote. If none of the nominees garnered the four votes necessary for election, the two nominees with the most votes would advance to a second ballot.“I don’t get to vote for anybody, under the current process,” he said last week.Stratton also raised concerns during the board officer elections last year — which accounted for two of the four non-unanimous votes by the school board out of nearly 2,200 taken during Superintendent Jim Hinson’s tenure – that the timing of the officer elections in July, as mandated by state law, meant that a school board member could be serving as president at the same time he or she was up for reelection.Such would be the case if Craig Denny, the SM West representative who currently serves as board vice president, were to be elected to the presidency. And, over the past several years, the pattern has been for the current vice president to be elected to the president’s seat. Denny, who has served on the board for more than 20 years, is facing challenges from two candidates for the SM West seat, former district capital project supervisor Chris White and pastor Laura Guy.The officer election process is just one of the issues the board is considering as part of a new manual of procedures for board members. Denny led a committee to help draft the manual, which puts into writing a number of guidelines and policies that have been informal to date. Last Monday, the board spent time reviewing the first sections of the manual, including a section on “Expectations of Individual Board Members,” which includes the following guidelines, among others:Do not surprise or embarrass the superintendent or other board members in public.Do not use board position for personal or partisan gain.Recognize conflicts of interest, whether real or perceived, disclose such interest to the board president and superintendent and recuse yourself from related actions.Respectfully listen to stakeholder comments. Refer stakeholders to appropriate school personnel who can assist them.Take no private action that will compromise or embarrass the board, the administration or the district.The full list of expectations in the draft document is copied below. The manual draft in its entirety is embedded after that. The document can be downloaded here.[gview file=”https://dfv6pkw99pxmo.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/31075148/SMSD-BOE-Manual.Draft-for-Board-Discussion.pdf”]last_img read more

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PW Global’s Smith is designer of the year

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Antiques & Design Show Benefit Cocktail Party

first_img Share A preview benefit cocktail party for the 2019 East Hampton Antiques & Design Show was held on Friday evening, July 19, on the grounds of Mulford Farm in the heart of East Hampton Village. Guests had the opportunity to meet with the dynamic design duo of Jonathan Adler, potter and modern American design maverick, and partner Simon Doonan, TV personality, author, and window dresser extraordinaire. Guests enjoyed an early buying opportunity of the impressive array of antiques, art, jewelry, and timelessly chic furniture, accessories, and collectibles. Ticket proceeds benefited the East Hampton Historical Society.last_img read more

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IWDC update on atmospheric gases, CO2 supply

first_imgThe IWDC sent out a communication advising that atmospheric gases are adequate, but CO2 requires attention.In the communication about reliability of the gas supply chain, Richard Mansmann, Vice-President Gas Programs at the IWDC, advises there is no expected interruption in the production of oxygen, which will see increased demand from hospitals as they battle Covid-19.Mansmann said, “I’ve been in regular contact with Air Products, and I believe their position is consistent with the other industrial gas producers. As the production of oxygen and nitrogen are essential services, there is no current anticipation of a supply interruption of oxygen, nitrogen and argon. However, I strongly encourage that you stay in contact with your local terminal’s distribution staff as there may always be a possibility of driver illnesses. Please advise your supplier of any known operational changes at your facilities and your customers so that critical customers are taken care of without delay.“Finally, if you do your own bulk transportation, consider advising your supplier that you can make certain bulk deliveries for them should the need arise. Even if you can only support nitrogen, consider that impact, allowing the supplier to satisfy the medical oxygen demand.”But Mansmann says he is concerned about future CO2 supply in the US as gasoline and diesel slows.“While the atmospheric gas supply seems adequate, please monitor your carbon dioxide supply carefully, especially those of you with significant activity in dry-ice production and sales,” Mansmann said.“As we’ve discussed at several of our meetings, the CO2 is a byproduct, and is subject to interruption for many reasons beyond the suppliers’ control. Keep in mind that many of the primary CO2 generators may be forced to reduce capacity significantly. Gasoline and diesel fuel demand has obviously slowed, this may result in less CO2 produced and purified at the refinery level. Likewise, as we enter spring, natural gas demand falls, and with it, the activity of primary and mid-stream strippers who extract the CO2 to raise the heating content of the pipeline natural gas.“Most importantly for most of the IWDC family, our primary independent CO2 suppliers rely on ethanol production as their CO2 source, and with lower gasoline demand, ethanol demand will fall proportionally. Reduced demand for ethanol will lead to reductions in CO2 production by the ethanol manufacturers. I’ll leave it to you all in the agricultural areas to gauge spring and summer plantings to estimate ammonia-based fertiliser production. My guess now is that ammonia-based CO2 sources will weather this crisis, but I’d suggest that all other CO2 production may fall as much as 20-25%. Watch the gasoline production numbers weekly, they will correlate directly to about 65% of the total CO2 supply.”last_img read more

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