Recovering Drug Addict with Long Rap Sheet Jumps to Rescue Man in Subway

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThe recovering drug addict with a long rap sheet who had just sat down on the bench in a Philadelphia train station often wondered if he was a good person, and perhaps never considered that anyone thought he was a hero to anybody.But there was no self-doubt when Christopher Knafelc’s instincts kicked in Thursday and he leaped onto the tracks to help a complete stranger he’d just seen flail and fall off the platform. Now, Knafelc, 32, is being hailed as a hero and he’s holding his head a little higher, viewing the good deed he did, and the praise that followed, as another sign that he is on the right path in life.(READ the story from the CS Monitor)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Mae Jeweral Ford

first_imgMae Jeweral Ford, 74, was a life long resident of Port Arthur, passed on June 1, 2016, surrounded by family and friends. Funeral services will be Saturday, June 11, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. First Sixth Street Baptist Church. Viewing begins at 9:00 a.m. with Rev. Kalan Gardner officiating. Interment will follow at Live Oak Memorial Park. Services entrusted to Hannah Funeral Home, Inc.last_img

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Vermonters fire questions at health care exchange forum in Waterbury

first_imgby Andrew Stein June 13, 2013 vtdigger.org More than 60 Vermonters gathered in a basement room at Waterbury’s Thatcher Brook Primary School on Wednesday to learn about the state’s new health insurance marketplace, Vermont Health Connect.PHOTO: Lindsey Tucker, deputy commissioner of the Department of Vermont Health Connect, addresses a crowd at a public forum Wednesday, June 13, 2013, at Thatcher Brook Primary School in Waterbury. Photo by Andrew Stein/VTDiggerLindsey Tucker, deputy commissioner of the Department of Vermont Health Connect, fielded questions about the Web-based market, which is slated to open Oct. 1. On Jan. 1, 2014, the more than 100,000 Vermonters buying insurance individually or through businesses with 50 or fewer full-time employees will be required to purchase coverage on the exchange.Sheila Rochefort and her family drove from East Montpelier and Stowe to learn how the new regulations surrounding the exchange would affect their business, Vermont Tire and Service.‘We need a navigator to come in and talk to our employees because offering insurance through the company they will receive no subsidies,’Rochefort said. ‘That seems really unfair to them. If they can get help paying their premiums, it would be unconscionable of us to actually deny them that opportunity.’But the Rocheforts aren’t entirely sure whether their business qualifies for the exchange or not because their 56 employees are right on the edge of eligibility for the small-group market, and large-group employers play by slightly different rules.Elizabeth Larimer (left) and Brenda Viens has questions about how the new health insurance exchange would affect their businesses. Photo by Andrew Stein/VTDiggerBrenda Viens is a bookkeeper for her son’s business, Viens Plumbing and Heating, LLC, in Fayston. Elizabeth Larimer, who does the accounting for Viens’nephew’s Richmond business, Russ/Wood Decorating, joined her.‘I’m concerned,’Larimer said. ‘It’s going to be a lot of change coming.’Viens, with more-than 45 years of accounting experience, said she is worried that learning curve for understanding the health care reform initiatives is very steep.‘If we can’t learn it in 24 hours, how are other people going to learn it in 24 hours?’she quipped.But all and all, Viens said, the challenge does not appear to be insurmountable. People simply need more information.Tucker told the group gathered in Waterbury that was why she was there.Using this power point presentation, she and a team of state officials waded through the ins and outs of the exchange.‘We are the government, and we’re here to help you,’she said.The questions and the answersThe Vermonters at the Waterbury public forum asked a range of questions. Here is an edited version of some of those questions and Tucker’s responses.For more public forum dates, see this calendar.Why are MVP and Blue Cross Blue Shield Vermont the only health insurance options on the exchange? How come there are only two health insurance companies and not Cigna and Aetna and other companies?Today, in our individual and small group market, we have two carriers: We have MVP and we have Blue Cross. Cigna is here in Vermont, but only in the large group market, and the exchange is only for individuals and small groups, defined as businesses with 50 or fewer full-time employees.Wasn’t there another company that applied for insurance status? The Vermont Health CO-OP? What happened to them?They applied for licensure through the Department of Financial Regulation, and they were denied and there’s currently talk about the possibility of an appeal. One of the reasons in the department’s report is that their premiums were higher. (For more on this issue, read here.How will the in-person guidance of navigators and brokers differ?They are very similar. The navigator program will have state and federal funding, so it will be free for Vermonters to use. The navigators will be certified, they will have 24 hours of training to sit down and help you. The broker community has a lot of expertise, and so an employer who has a relationship with a broker who knows the employer’s business and employees may wish to work with a broker. Brokers will charge a state-set fee, which will be finalized in the next few weeks.As a small business owner, can I have a navigator come into my business to discuss insurance options with all of my employees individually?Yes, and open enrollment starts Oct. 1, and it lasts six months until the end of March.Are the premiums the same for small businesses?Yes.If you’re a family, but you have adult children under the age of 26, do you apply as a family or do your older children apply individually? How do you access the subsidies to lower health insurance costs?Eligibility for federal and state subsidies is based on household income. So, if you in your household have one tax return or two different tax returns, your eligibility is based on that number or those numbers. Your young adult could apply with your family or on his or her own.Are members of the same family stuck with the same plan or can they access different plans?That’s something we are finalizing right now. We are working to determine how we can give Vermonters the most options possible and stick within the federal system. We will have that information by the end of the month.Who will police this eligibility?The federal government. Health and Human Services has created something called the federal hub. What this does is aggregates data and information from Homeland Security and the IRS and is tax-based. It’s your tax return that they base this information on. Whether your income goes up or down in the course of the year, it will all get trued up in the end through the IRS. We are hooked up to the federal hub, and we are a vehicle for Vermonters to be able to access coverage and subsidies.If your employer is from another state, can you continue to get insurance from them?You can continue to do that. If your plan is coming from Connecticut, it can continue to come from Connecticut. That Connecticut company has the option to offer you insurance through Vermont Health Connect, but they don’t have to.What will happen to the state-subsidized Catamount and VHAP health insurance programs?Beginning Jan. 1, 2014, those programs will go away. Folks who are eligible for Medicaid (earning up to 133 percent of the federal poverty line) and folks who are eligible for the exchange will go onto the exchange. There will be lots of notices coming over the summer.My son owns his own business, but he is on a Catamount plan. So, come Jan. 1, 2014, he will most likely have to buy insurance on the exchange?That’s right, and he would most likely be eligible for a subsidy.What are the main differences between the plans?The difference between the plans is how you pay for them. Some of them will have lower premiums and higher co-pays and some of them will have higher premiums and lower co-pays. There are four levels. Bronze is the lowest actuarial level, which means the least amount is covered by the plan. So, your premiums here would be low, but your out-of-pocket costs would be higher, so your deductible and copays would be higher. There’s a cap on both out-of-pocket costs and deductibles. At the high end, the platinum end, the premiums are going to be the highest, but the copays and deductibles will be the lowest.How do I pick a plan for my employees?If you are a small business owner, there are two options for you coming into the exchange. The first is to choose one carrier and pick a level or a dollar amount for your employees to buy up or buy down. Employees can say, ‘Here’s how much money my employer is giving me, this seems like a good plan.’Or they could say, ‘I really want to buy platinum.’The exchange will let you as the employer know what the employee has picked, so that you can deduct the appropriate amount from their paycheck. We will aggregate that information for you. The other option is a full-choice option ‘not limiting employees to just one insurer.Does the employer have to pay a portion of the employee’s insurance?No, and if there’s no employer support, an employee is eligible for subsidies.If employers are offering to pay a portion, how does that work? Is it pre-taxed?It’s pre-taxed just the way it is today.What businesses are eligible for the exchange?As you think about eligibility as a small business for the exchange, it’s 50 full-time employees or fewer, full-time being defined as 30 hours or more a week. As an employer, if you offer coverage to one of your full time employees, you have to offer coverage to all of them. You have to treat your full-timers equally. But you have a choice about your part-timers. You can offer them coverage or not.Is there a penalty for employers who don’t provide health insurance coverage?If you are a small employer, the employer assessment will still apply to you if you do not offer coverage or do not offer adequate coverage. However, there is a new federal assessment on large employers, and large employers are defined as 50 or more employees.If you are a larger employer and you do not offer coverage, there is a penalty that can be assessed on you; or if you’re an employer who offers coverage, but some of your employees find it unaffordable. If the premiums are higher than 9.5 percent of income, it’s unaffordable, and you may have a penalty assessed on you by the feds. There is no federal penalty for small employers.Will school districts that are self-insured be exempt?If you have more than 50 employees, you are not eligible for the exchange. If you have 50 or fewer, then you have to come into the exchange. There are associations that will need to break up and separate the small groups from the large groups. And the small groups have to come into the exchange.last_img read more

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McIntosh Adds Two New Amplifiers to Home Audio Lineup

first_imgMcIntosh just added two more amplifiers in the form of the MC830 Solid State Amplifier and C8 Vacuum Tube Preamplifier. Featuring styling reminiscent of the company’s 1950s and 1960s designs, the MC830 and C8 are full of modern-day technology to produce a home audio experience.MC830The MC830 is a one-channel solid-state amplifier that has a similar footprint to the MA252 Integrated Amplifier. The MC830 is a direct-coupled output design that is rated at 300 watts into 8 ohms or 480 watts into 4 ohms. A dual-scale watt-meter gives a readout of power output for both speaker impedances. McIntosh Monogrammed Heatsinks add visuals and will keep the MC830 running cool. Both a balanced and unbalanced input are included for connecting it to the rest of your music system.The MC830 includes two of McIntosh’s cornerstone home audio technologies. Its patented Power Guard technology monitors the amplifier’s output signal to protect speakers against being over driven; if necessary, it makes real-time micro-adjustments to the input signal to prevent clipping that could damage your speakers. Another level of protection is Sentry Monitor; its fuseless short-circuit protection circuit will disengage the MC830’s output stage before the current exceeds safe operating levels and then resets automatically when operating conditions return to normal.McIntosh’s patented Solid Cinch speaker binding posts can secure your speaker cables to prevent them from coming loose and possibly causing a short. The binding posts are gold-plated to avoid corrosion and to ensure a quality audio signal is sent to your speakers.C8The C8 Vacuum Tube Preamplifier is also similarly sized to the MA252 Integrated Amplifier and is powered by four 12AX7a vacuum tubes housed inside stylish protective cages. The C8 comes with one balanced and two unbalanced analog inputs, plus one moving coil and one moving magnet phono inputs with adjustable loading to play cherished vinyl collections. All inputs can be given user-friendly names to simplify user control. Bass and treble tone controls help fine-tune your music to personal preferences. For outputs, it has one balanced and two unbalanced; one of the unbalanced outputs can be configured as a subwoofer output for use with a powered subwoofer to enhance low frequencies further.While the C8 does not come equipped with any digital inputs from the factory, it is digital-audio-ready. McIntosh’s DA2 Digital Audio Module can be installed in it (adding the DA2 is an optional dealer-installed upgrade). The DA2 has seven digital inputs: two coax, two optical, one USB, one MCT (for use with McIntosh’s line of SACD/CD Transports) and one audio-only HDMI Audio Return Channel (ARC) connection. The DA2 is powered by a next-generation, Quad Balanced, eight-channel, 32-bit Digital-to-Analog Converter (DAC). Its audiophile-grade DAC is highlighted by improved dynamic range and improved total harmonic distortion. For high-resolution audio playback, the USB input can support native playback of up to DSD512. The USB input supports DXD up to 384 kilohertz, and the coax and optical inputs can decode digital music up to 24-bit/192kHz.The C8 comes with McIntosh’s High Drive headphone amplifier. Home Theater Pass Through allows the C8 to be seamlessly integrated into your home theater system, and Data Ports can send remote control commands to connected source components.Input selection, bass, treble, tone bypass, balance and input offset levels can be adjusted using the front panel knobs or the included remote control; all settings, volume level and input selection will be shown on the front panel display.Common Features:Both the MC830 and C8 include power control ports that allow for system power up and shutdown by sending power on/off signals to other connected McIntosh components. Both also have a user-selectable auto-off feature that will turn them off after 30 minutes when there’s been no user input or no audio signal.A die-cast aluminum name badge is affixed to each side of the chassis on each unit, and the front, top and rear of the chassis is polished to a mirror finish. Each unit features a black glass front panel with silver trim, a blue wattmeter (on the MC830 only), an illuminated logo, and control knobs.The MC830 is $4,000, and the C8 is $3,500.last_img read more

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London Gateway makes its mark with mega-sheds and giant containers

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Our Lady Of Poland Turns 100

first_imgA group of 27 Polish immigrants — mostly farmers who carried traditions from their homeland to the fertile fields of the East End — established Our Lady of Poland Roman Catholic Church in Southampton in 1918. Now, 100 years later, their grandchildren are preparing a series of events over the next six months to mark the centennial of its founding.The parish’s first centennial event — a special Mass celebrated by Bishop Andrzej Zglejszewski — will be held on June 30. The Mass, which will be in English and Polish, will begin at 5 PM, and will be followed by a Jubilee Dinner Dance at 6:15 PM in Southampton Polish Hall, 230 Elm Street, Southampton.There will also be no shortage of Polish favorites such as kielbasa, golabki, pierogi, and cheese blintzes. The event will feature an open bar, music by Windstar, Chinese auction, and table gift.Polish immigrants first started moving to the East End, settling in Riverhead, Bridgehampton, and Water Mill in 1886. It wasn’t long before the growing community wanted a house of worship of its own, so members got to work raising money for the effort. Ground was broken on October 21, 1918, and the final work was completed on the church on December 24, just in time for Christmas Day Mass, which was offered by the parish’s first priest, Father Alexander Cizmowski.The church, which is located on Maple Street, has thrived over the years, continuing to serve the Polish community on the East End, as well as friends and summer visitors.“There is a very large Polish community from Riverhead to Montauk,” said parishioner Thea Dombrowki-Fry.The church has maintained many of its traditions, including Polish Masses. The parish still has a Polish priest, maintains a Polish-American Society, and has a Polish library in its basement. The church’s parishioners attend Sunday socials, and celebrate special events such as birthdays and anniversaries as a community, and always come together to help other parishioners in need, said Dombrowski-Fry, who is also a member of the Polish-American Society and the Polish Veterans’ Ladies Auxiliary.“We are pretty busy,” she added.The second centennial event of the church’s jubilee year, a tour of the church, will be held on July 1, though a time has not been set for the event. Three days later, on July 4, parishioners will also take part in the Southampton Village Fourth of July Parade, along with a group of Polish singers and dancers. The group will also take part in the Pulaski Day Parade in New York on October 3. Parishioners and church leaders are also in the process of arranging a Polish veterans memorial at the Sacred Hearts Cemetery. The year’s events will culminate in a 100th Anniversary Mass on Christmas Day, December 25.But for now, Dombrowski-Fry said she is looking forward to the upcoming Mass on June 30.“It’s going to be absolutely beautiful. There are a lot of dignitaries who are invited to the Mass. We are hoping that 100 years from now, our great-grandchildren will celebrate 200 years. That’s the whole idea,” she said.For more information about Our Lady of Poland’s centennial events, visit www.olpchurch.org. Tickets for the jubilee dinner dance are $100 and may be ordered from Erika by sending an email to olpchurch@optonline.net or by calling 631-283-0667.peggy@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Praxair México completes Altamira complex

first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

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Wartsila DF engines ordered for five more Yamal LNG carriers

first_imgFive new Arc 7 design ice-class LNG carriers being built at the Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering yard in South Korea will be powered by a total of 30 Wärtsilä 50DF dual-fuel engines. The vessels will operate in arctic conditions to serve the Yamal LNG project in Northern Russia. The order was placed in January with Wärtsilä’s joint venture company, Wärtsilä Hyundai Engine who will also build the engines in South Korea, Wärtsilä said in a statement.Each of the LNG carriers will be fitted with four 12-cylinder Wärtsilä 50DF engines and two 9-cylinder Wärtsilä 50DF engines. The engines will primarily utilise liquefied natural gas as fuel, but are also capable of running on conventional marine diesel fuels. When operating in arctic conditions, the vessels will be required to handle ambient temperatures of as much as minus 50 degrees Celsius, and to break through ice up to two metres thick.“Altogether, Wärtsilä has been contracted within the past twelve months to supply 90 dual-fuel engines to fifteen of these Arc 7 ice-class LNG carriers for the Yamal project,” says Lars Anderson, Vice President, Wärtsilä Ship Power.Yamal LNG is a Russian project, which by the end of 2017 is expected to produce 16.5 million tons of LNG per year for shipment to European, Asian and South American customers.[mappress mapid=”16602″]Image: DSMElast_img read more

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Bristow takes on Gulf of Mexico SAR work for Shell

first_imgBristow Group has been awarded a contract with Shell for medevac and search and rescue (SAR) services in the Gulf of Mexico.The contract has been awarded to the offshore helicopter transportation provider’s subsidiary, Bristow U.S. LLC, the company informed on Tuesday.“We are drawing on our years of experience of safely and efficiently operating SAR around the world to deliver the highest standard of rescue service and medical care in the Gulf of Mexico,” said Bristow Americas Regional Director Samantha Willenbacher.“With our rescue fleet, all parts of the Gulf of Mexico are within reach of this lifesaving service.”According to the company, as part of the contract, Shell will also join the new SAR consortium formed by Bristow, which aims to provide service and lifesaving capability to members while simultaneously reducing overall costs associated with SAR.Bristow will deploy a dedicated Sikorsky S-92 and a Leonardo AW139 to provide SAR response services. Also, a dispatch system staffed by registered EMTs will provide pre-arrival medical instructions over the phone and prioritize and manage response efforts in the event that multiple, simultaneous call-outs are received, Bristow said.The helicopter provider will operate the new service from its standalone SAR facility at the South Lafourche Airport in Galliano, Louisiana.last_img read more

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LSC wins appeal in landmark case on legal aid payments

first_imgThe appeal court has overturned a High Court judgment that delays by the Legal Services Commission in seeking to recover payments on account amounted to an abuse of process. The LSC had sought to recoup an alleged overpayment of £109,064 made to barrister Aisha Henthorn relating to cases undertaken between 1987 and 2000 under a civil legal aid certificate. There was no allegation or suggestion of impropriety by Henthorn, who is now in her seventies and voluntarily disbarred herself in 2001 due to ill health. On appeal, the LSC reduced its claims to £80,470 in respect of cases carried out between June 1992 and September 1998. In a test case on limitation, the principal issue concerned when time started to run under the Limitation Act 1980 in relation to the LSC’s claims, and whether the agency had left it too late to pursue them. In March, the High Court held that the time runs from the date that the work is actually completed, which meant that the LSC’s claims were time-barred because they related to work completed more than six years before the proceedings were commenced. Criticising the ‘culture of delay’ at the LSC, Judge Thornton ruled that the ‘stale nature’ of the claims had ‘severely disadvantaged’ Henthorn’s ability to defend them – some of which related to work done over 20 years ago – and amounted to an abuse of process. Following an appeal by the LSC, in which the Law Society and Bar Council intervened, the Court of Appeal today overturned that ruling. Giving judgment, Master of the Rolls Lord Neuberger, sitting with Lord Justice Lewison and Sir Stephen Sedley, held that time starts running not from the date that the case is completed, but once the costs have been assessed by a costs judge. It was argued on behalf of Henthorn, supported by the Law Society and Bar Council, that this could leave solicitors and barristers not knowing how much they were entitled to for a very long time; and that lawyers would, therefore, have to retain their papers and other records for an indefinite period. However, Neuberger saw no problem with this, given that it was the solicitor’s duty to ensure that a costs assessment was carried out. Neuberger also overturned the previous ruling that the LSC’s claims amounted to an abuse of process, because the passage of time meant Henthorn could not properly defend the claims as she had wound up her practice and disposed of her papers. He said: ‘In my view there is nothing in this point. Where a claim is based on a statutory right subject to a limitation period, which has not yet expired, it seems to me that it would require wholly exceptional facts before an abuse argument based on delay could have any chance of success.’ An LSC spokesman said: ‘The LSC is pleased the Court of Appeal’s judgment in LSC v Aisha Henthorn has clarified the limitation period for recovering unrecouped payments on account, recognising our providers’ responsibilities for assessment of costs.’ He added: ‘The issue of claims where there has been no assessment remains outstanding, but we urge all providers to ensure final claims for costs are made promptly and in accordance with our contract.’ Law Society chief executive Desmond Hudson said: ‘We are disappointed with the judgment. We hope Mrs Henthorn appeals and if she does we would seek to intervene again.’ Hudson said the outcome does not affect the separate maladministration complaint made by the Society in 2008 to the Parliamentary Ombudsman in relation to late claims made by the LSC for the recoupment of payments on account. In light of the Henthorn judgment, the Society will be issuing new guidance to solicitors on record-keeping in legal aid cases. Nicholas Bacon QC, who led for the Bar Council on this issue, commented: ‘Whilst the judgment is disappointing, it has nevertheless provided some much needed legal clarity as to when time starts to run with regard to the Limitation Act in relation to civil legal aid payment on account cases. It also offers the potential for remedies that a barrister may have against a solicitor who fails to meet their obligations.’ Read the the full judgment.last_img read more

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