Aphex Twin Says You Have To Be Mentally Ill To Be Famous, Believes In Aliens & The Illuminati

first_imgRichard D James, otherwise known as Aphex Twin, recently disclosed to Q Magazine that all famous people are mentally ill. He explains,“I have hung around with enough famous people to realise they’ve got a serious insecurity problem. I think you have to be mentally ill to be really famous … If you’re like Madonna, then you’re properly mentally ill, basically. Because you have to be … I’m only partially mentally ill, because I’m semi-famous!”James goes on to discuss his belief in aliens, the illuminati, and magic.“Even if none of it’s true, it’s just a thousand times better than any science fiction film that’s ever been written. You can’t only believe things which can be proven. It’s boring.”He says this holds true for his recent mysterious Aphex Twin logo, explaining:“You think of something that you want to happen, then you turn it into something that looks like a magic symbol, and then you put it out in the world, and it works. It does … But if you tell anyone what the symbol means, then it will stop working.last_img read more

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Watch Pro-Shot Footage Of STS9’s Entire Halloween Show

first_imgSetlist: STS9 at The Fillmore, Silver Spring, MD – 10/31/15SET 1:HB WALKS TO SCHOOL>ABCeesPoseidonPossibilitiesYou’re ItHidden Hand, Hidden FistArigatoLife’s Sweet BreathSET 2:Love Don’t TerrorizeONE A DAYWhen The Dust SettlesEbEvasive ManeuversNEW NEW 4 U UDanceClick Lang EchoEncore:JUST THANKSSTS92nd Encore:World Go Round STS9 threw down a major Halloween rager at The Fillmore in Silver Spring, MD (just outside DC), and it was hot. They had some fun with their setlist, spelling out “Happy Halloween DC” over the course of their two sets. Watch the pro-shot footage below, and enjoy. The show also featured some major bust-outs, including “HB Walks To School”, “One A Day”, “New New 4 U U” and “Just Thanks”.STS9’s fall tour takes them to the PlayStation Theater in New York, NY this Thursday, November 5th. Tickets and more information can be found here.STS9 Spells Out ‘HAPPY HALLOWEEN DC’ in Setlist, Complete With Major Bust Outslast_img read more

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Orgone Releases Soulful ‘Beyond The Sun’ Album On Vinyl

first_imgAlready being touted as “an instant classic,” Orgone’s seventh album Beyond the Sun is being released for the first time on vinyl, by Colemine Records. This is the Los Angeles band’s first record featuring searing soul singer Adryon de León, who has taken the group’s already dynamic range and reach to new heights.Recorded at Orgone’s own KillionSound Studios, Beyond the Sun delivers lyrical tracks written by Kelly Finnigan (of Monophonics) and Danny Chaimson, songwriters responsible for several of the band’s historically best-loved songs. Featured producers Mocky (Feist, Jamie Lidell) and Dan Ubick (of The Lions) add new textures to Orgone’s signature California Soul sound.To support the vinyl release of “Beyond the Sun,” Orgone will tour California in March. Featuring artwork by Kevin Vigil and photography by Ryan Chin, the album’s heavy-duty tip-on gatefold jackets give it a luxe, book-like feel that class up any collection.For those interested in jamming out to the new Orgone record, head to the Colemine website!last_img read more

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Remembering David Bowie Through The Many Musical Tributes In 2016

first_imgFive years ago today, the music world was shaken by the news that pop icon David Bowie had passed away at the age of 69 after an unpublicized battle with liver cancer. In addition to a massive outpouring of condolences and memorials of Bowie in the media (and even a special fireworks display in Sydney), countless musicians paid tribute to the late superstar through their music, covering his catalog in their own live shows. As we remember Bowie today, we take a look back at some of the most memorable live David Bowie tributes from the year of his death.Less than two weeks after Bowie’s passing, Umphrey’s McGee was scheduled to play a three-night run at the Beacon Theatre. For their January 21st performance, in addition to a tribute to recently-deceased Glenn Frey, the band encored with a pair of Bowie tunes: “Space Oddity” and “Fame”. You can watch footage of Umph’s tribute to the fallen Star Man below:[Video: mkdevo]Moe. Begins New Year’s Celebration With Tributes To David Bowie & Carrie Fisher [Full Audio]At 2016’s Electric Forest Festival, hosts The String Cheese Incident used the second set of their second of three performances to pay tribute to Bowie and Prince, who also passed away early in the year. String Cheese opened up their tribute with a cover of Prince’s “Kiss,” before calling on Karl Denson for a run of songs that included Bowie’s “Let’s Dance,” Prince’s “Let’s Go Crazy,” and Bowie’s “Space Oddity.” You can watch some of the magic below:[Video: Tom Heinrich]Pink Talking Fish & Kung Fu Perform The Music Of Prince And David Bowie At Catskill Chill [Full Audio]At this year’s Mountain Jam, Marco Benevento & Superhuman Happiness put on a full-set Bowie tribute. Gov’t Mule guitarist and festival co-host Warren Haynes joined the band for a rousing rendition of “Rebel, Rebel”, which you can watch below:[Video: Mountain Jam]Tom Hamilton Recreates David Bowie’s Blackstar At Masquerade Ball [Audio/Gallery]Phish has never been shy about proclaiming Bowie’s influence on their music. In addition to their own classic composition (“David Bowie”) that bears the artist’s name, the band’s cover of “Life On Mars?” is a highly sought-after gem in their live repertoire. In the wake of Bowie’s death, many Phish fans wondered how the band would pay homage to the pop legend. As it turned out, the band had a variety of touching tributes in store during the ensuing year. First, on night one of their two night stand at Chicago’s Wrigley Field, Phish debuted “Space Oddity” as an a cappella tune. The impressive, intricate arrangement sees the band recreate both the song’s vocal and instrumental parts (including Trey Anastasio hilariously singing the guitar solos). You can watch the live debut of Phish’s arrangement of “Space Oddity” from Wrigley below:[Video: WarEagleTimeMachine]The a cappella “Space Oddity” became a staple of the band’s live rotation for the rest of the year, being performed four more times after Wrigley. The fourth and most recent of these served as the encore for the band’s 2016 Halloween show, but it was far from the only hat tip to Bowie on 10/31/16. For their traditional “musical costume”, Phish performed David Bowie’s classic album The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars in its entirety with help from a string section and backup singers. You can also listen to the full show here.The massive outpouring of love and appreciation for David Bowie in the year following his death (and beyond) was incredible and inspiring and affirms just how special a talent this man was. We miss you, Star Man. Thank you for all of the magic that you bestowed upon us.last_img read more

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McDonald Center for Student Well-Being opens

first_imgThis semester, the University officially opened the Rev. James E. McDonald, C.S.C., McDonald Center for Student Well-Being in Saint Liam Hall. The facility, known as McWell for short, was endowed last year by a $10 million gift from 1979 alumnus Mark Gallogly and his wife, Lise Strickler.Kelly Hogan Stewart, Director of the McDonald Center, said the center aims to increase the well-being of campus as a whole.“We are prevention, not treatment,” Stewart said. “So treatment is more about putting back together what may have become fragmented, broken or fractured. Well-being is really about increasing a person’s capacity and their ability-thriving.”Stewart said the center, housed at 204 Saint Liam Hall, hopes to positively impact the campus through the implementation of its mission and the scope of its vision. She cited “wellness enhancement” and “risk reduction” as key elements in increasing well-being for college students, who are at an imperative time in their lives in terms of learning how be well.She said the new center’s current priority is gaining recognition on campus through pushes like engaging students with creative events and programs throughout the year.“We’re doing things like pet love, wellness expos or a spin-off cash cab,” she said.Beyond events, Stewart said the center will work to provide students with resources to pursue well-being.“A truly robust health promotion department on any college campus is very connected to many resources, whether it be the academy, the community, any other departments within student affairs, so that could include a variety of departments like RecSports, the Gender Relations Center, MSPS,” Stewart said.Moving beyond the walls of Saint Liam, well-being commissioners within the residential halls will address the wellness needs of their own dorms and promote the mission of the center, Stewart said.“It really is our opportunity to provide services and resources directly into the residential halls,” Stewart said. “The commissioners will be the point people and engage with our department as another avenue for students to tell us what they need in their residential communities.”Stewart said that in order for the center to be successful, students need to know how health promotion functions and works with students and other factors that affect health dynamics at Notre Dame.“The way I explain what is health promotion is it’s really making the healthier choice the easier choice. It’s allowing people to live balanced within an imbalanced life,” Stewart said.The McDonald Center for Student Well-Being is looking to change the way Notre Dame addresses health and in effect change how students here address health for the rest of their lives, she said.“In the United States, our health care system and our mindset is structured to focus on the broken and then they think the absence of being broken is health,” Stewart said. “But that’s just one piece of it. High quality health and well-being is actually living a life which is filled with flourishing and thriving.”Tags: McDonald Center, Saint Liam’s, student well-beinglast_img read more

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State auditor gives mild rebuke to three departments over performance reviews

first_imgVermont Business Magazine Vermont Auditor Doug Hoffer released his review of whether certain departments of state government were performing their required employee performance review. His conclusion was that they largely were not and that some long-serving employees had never received a performance review, as required by state policy. The auditor does not have the authority to punish another department or personnel. But the departments in question agreed with Hoffer’s assessment of the situation and with his suggested remedies, some of which are already in place.Doug Hoffer. See full report HERE(link is external).In his report, Hoffer wrote that “performance evaluations are key to holding individual public servants accountable, and Vermont state policy and statute requires that performance evaluations be completed annually for classified employees. Only 63 percent of respondents to the 2015 State of Vermont Employee Engagement Survey agreed that performance evaluations are completed annually in their respective departments.“Our audit objective was to determine whether classified employees in the departments of Human Resources (DHR), Information & Innovation (DII), and Finance & Management (F&M) received timely annual performance evaluations in 2015. We focused our audit on these departments because they had some of the lowest levels of performance evaluations completed in 2015, according to the employee engagement surveys.“As a result of our audit, we concluded that only 27 of 181 classified employees in the three departments received an annual performance evaluation in 2015. Furthermore, a non-statistical sample of 20 of 154 classified employees who did not receive an annual evaluation in 2015 revealed that nine had not received an annual performance evaluation for more than five years, and three with hire dates in 2013, 2012, and 1998 had no record of an annual evaluation.“We interviewed 22 of 46 supervisors from these three departments to understand the causes for the low level of completed annual performance evaluations for 2015. These interviews showed the following:Most supervisors did not know whether their own written performance expectations included the responsibility for annual evaluations, and the supervisors they reported to had not followed up with them in 2015regarding annual performance evaluations.About half stated they did not begin receiving notifications of upcoming evaluations that were due until late 2015 or early 2016.Less than half (45 percent) indicated they had received some training in the State’s performance evaluation system.“Senior officials in DII and F&M indicated that annual performance evaluations were not a priority in their departments, but they would be going forward. DHR hired an additional field administrator in late 2015 who has been working to improve the process to ensure annual performance evaluations are completed. “Within the next two years, all designated supervisors and managers are required to complete the DHR four-day course, Supervising in State Government Level 1, which addresses performance evaluation topics such as key steps to a performance review and completing the required performance evaluation form.Recommendations The auditor made a variety of recommendations to the commissioners of DHR, DII, and F&M, such as including in supervisors’ written performance expectations the responsibility for timely completion of performance evaluations; reviewing data regarding which supervisors have completed Supervising in State Government 1(SSG1); and ensuring that those supervisors that have not completed the course, do so before the end of 2018.The commissioners of the departments audited sent a memo back to Hoffer agreeing with his recommendations and noting that several of the practice and policy changes were already under way.In part they wrote: “The Department of Human Resources is already tackling many of the issues contained in the audit recommendations. We are supportive of all the audit recommendations, will move forward on the items identified above, and will include completion of performance appraisals as a performance expectation for all supervisors/managers within DHR.BackgroundDHR oversees the State’s Performance Management System. According to DHR, this system provides an effective supervisory tool that can enhance the productivity and motivation of employees. DHR’s Guide to the State’s Performance Management System describes the three components of the State’s approach:1) setting employee job expectations;2) observing employee performance and providing feedback throughout the year; and3) completing an annual performance evaluation documenting the employee’s actual performance over the year compared to performance expectations.DHR’s Field Services and Workforce Development division provides human resources support and services to employees, agencies, and departments throughout state government. Field Services Teams, which in some instances are embedded within agencies and departments, act as the liaison between agencies and departments and DHR’s Operations division. These teams provide a variety of human resources functions for assigned departments, including performance management. Specifically, they provide consultative services on the phases of performance management, including performance evaluations, and may audit performance evaluations to ensure they are in compliance with personnel policies and the CBA.3 V.S.A. §322 requires that officers and employees that act in a supervisory capacity complete service rating forms3 at least annually for each classified employee under their immediate supervision in accordance with the service rating procedures established by the Commissioner of Human Resources. A classified employee is an employee of the State of Vermont who is hired to fill a position in the classified service in accordance with merit principles as administered by DHR. 4 Classified service positions include permanent full-time, limited service, confidential,5 managerial,6 and supervisory7 positions.DHR Policy 7.0 applies to all classified state employees and requires that annual performance evaluations be completed for all classified employees on the anniversary date of the employee’s completion of original probation,8 or on the anniversary date of restoration or reduction-in-force rehire to State service.The CBAs require a meeting be held to discuss an evaluation within 45 days after the applicable anniversary date9 and apply to all classified employees who belong to a bargaining unit (e.g., non- management or supervisory). If the deadline is not met, the employee is assigned an annual overall presumptive rating equal to his or her last annual overall rating, but not less than a satisfactory rating.10 Written feedback furnished to an employee, which would have constituted the annual evaluation had it been timely, is not considered an evaluation and is not put in the employee’s file.Classified employees designated as confidential or managerial are not members of a bargaining unit. The CBA provisions related to holding an evaluation meeting within 45 days of an anniversary date and presumptive ratings are not applicable to confidential and managerial employees.Footnotes to Report:1) This relates to all classified employees who were employed at the three departments at December 31, 2015.2) Performance Management, Society for Human Resource Management, November 20, 2012.  3) All classified employees receive an annual performance evaluation on a prescribed form, AA-PER-6C. See Appendix III for an example ofa performance evaluation form.4) Employment within the executive branch of state government is either classified or exempt. The exempt category includes state police, temporary, elected, and appointed positions.5) A classified employee having responsibility for, knowledge of, or access to information relating to collective bargaining, personnel administration, or budgetary matters that would make membership in or representation by an employee organization incompatible with his or her official duties.6) The Vermont Labor Relations Board (VLRB) determines whether a managerial position is exempt or classified. A managerial position requires an employee to function as head of an agency, department, or institution, or as director of a major program or division.7) VLRB determines which positions are supervisory. “Supervisory” means an individual having authority to make decisions about hires, promotions, layoffs, and discipline.  8) The end of probation generally is six months after the date of hire.9) The “applicable anniversary date” is the anniversary of the employee’s completion of original probation, or on the anniversary of restoration or reduction-in-force rehire to state service.10) There are four ratings: outstanding, excellent, satisfactory, and unsatisfactory.  11) This relates to all classified employees who were employed at the three departments at December 31, 2015.  12) Survey response rates in 2014 and 2013 respectively were 97 percent and 72 percent (DHR), 66 percent and 60 percent (DII), and 44 percent and 58 percent (F&M).  13) An agreement by the executive branch called an extension of benefits, specifies which provisions are relevant for confidential and managerial employees. Medical/dental insurance, annual leave, parental/family leave, and court/jury duty are among the benefits that extend to confidential and managerial employees.  14) Per DHR Policy No. 2.3 this is the person authorized by statute or lawfully-delegated authority to appoint and dismiss employees. According to DHR, appointing authority may be the exempt agency or department head, or may be a senior individual in the chain of command who has been delegated authority to review and sign off on performance evaluations.15) Performance Management by Elaine D. Pulakos, SHRM Foundation, page 28.  16) VTHR is the system the State utilizes to process hires, track employee movement, create payroll, and house data for federal and state reporting. VTHR is an Oracle/PeopleSoft system.  17) This form is utilized to assign signature authorization for persons authorized to approve purchasing, payroll, personnel, and other documents.  Auditor Mission StatementThe mission of the Auditor’s Office is to hold state government accountable. This means ensuring that taxpayer funds are used effectively and efficiently, and that we foster the prevention of waste, fraud, and abuse.Source: State Auditor 7.27.2016last_img read more

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January 15, 2014 Disciplinary Actions

first_imgJanuary 15, 2014 Disciplinary Actions January 15, 2014 Disciplinary Actions Disciplinary Actions Prepared by The Florida Bar’s Public Information and Bar Services Department ________________________________________________________________ center_img The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders disciplined 21 attorneys; disbarring two, suspending 17, and publicly reprimanding two. Seven attorneys received more than one form of discipline, with three being placed on probation, one being publicly reprimanded, and three ordered to pay restitution.The following lawyers have been disciplined: Russell Samuel Adler,  55 S.E. Second Ave.,  Delray Beach, suspended  for 91 days following a November 14 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1986) Adler misrepresented his finances and equity status within the law firm where he worked to a cooperative apartment board. Further, he misinformed the board that he was financing 90 percent of the purchase price when in fact he was financing 100 percent of the purchase price. He also sought and obtained from his law firm a letter that misrepresented his financial status so that he would be approved to purchase the cooperative apartment in New York City. Finally, during his four-year tenure supervising the law firm’s personal injury practice group, none of the settlement statements prepared by his department contained any attorney’s signature or even a space for an attorney to sign as required by Bar rules. (Case No. SC11-1863) Libio Calejo,  2500 N.W. 79th Ave., Suite 102,  Doral, disbarred  effective immediately, following an October 31 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2004) Calejo was found in contempt for failing to comply with the terms of a May 15 suspension order. He was ordered to notify all his clients, opposing counsel, and tribunals of his suspension and provide The Florida Bar within 30 days of the suspension, a sworn affidavit listing the names and addresses of all persons and entities that were furnished a copy of his suspension order. (Case No. SC13-1252) Robert B. Cook,  P.O. Box 3609,  Tequesta, suspended  for 90 days following a November 27 court order. Further, Cook shall pay  restitution  of more than $57,000 to 13 clients. (Admitted to practice: 1971) Between 2010 and 2012, Cook engaged in a continuing course of conduct involving cases in which clients sought credits on their credit cards, claiming that the purchased services did not occur. Cook was affiliated with an entity as a referral source, which solicited business on his behalf. Although he was unaware of the solicitation, Cook allowed his nonlawyer staff to handle the cases with little supervision from him. (Case No. SC13-1925)  Theodore R. Doran,  P.O. Box 15110,  Daytona Beach, suspended  for 60 days, effective December 18, 2013. (Admitted to practice: 1982) Doran was the subject of several Florida Bar disciplinary matters. He used improper evidence in a dissolution of marriage case, requiring him to pay opposing counsel’s fees in the matter. In another case, Doran apologized to another opposing counsel after she complained to the Bar regarding his unsolicited advances verbally and via electronic mail messages; in a third case, he had a consensual sexual encounter with a client he was representing in a pending dissolution of marriage case. (Case No. SC13-1920) Joseph Henry Fernandez,  12972 S.W. 136th Terrace,  Miami, suspended  for three years, effective 30 days from a November 21 court order. Further, upon reinstatement, Fernandez is placed on  probation  for one year. (Admitted to practice: 1986) After being retained to represent a client in a civil matter, Fernandez failed to adequately communicate. In other matters, he failed to file the proper documents to administer an estate and he failed to attend a properly noticed court hearing. (Case No. SC12-2388) Will Rogers Helton, Jr.,  900 N. Pace Blvd., Unit B,  Pensacola, suspended  for 180 days, effective 30 days from a November 27 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1986) Helton was also a member of the South Carolina Bar. This is a reciprocal discipline case from South Carolina, where the misconduct occurred. During a seven-month period, Helton personally handled real estate closings that took place outside his law office. His nonlawyer assistants handled most of the closing that took place in the law office, without the presence or supervision of a licensed attorney. In most cases, the non-lawyer assistants would sign Helton’s name as a witness on deeds, mortgages, and other closing documents. (Case No. SC13-248) Marc Scott Levin,  P.O. Box 1817,  New York, NY, suspended  until further order, following a November 6 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1987) Levin was arrested after attempting to buy cocaine from an undercover narcotics officer. He pleaded no contest in court, adjudication was withheld, and Levin was sentenced to 18 months probation. (Case No. SC13-2089) Kelly Bernard Mathis,  1200 Riverplace Blvd., Suite 902,  Jacksonville, suspended  effective December 18, following an October 29 court order. (Admitted to practice:1988) Mathis was found guilty in court of racketeering, possession of a slot machine or device, and assisting in setting up, promoting or conducting a lottery. (Case No. SC13-2031) Beverly Ann McComas,  7530 N.W. Third Court,  Plantation, suspended  for 90 days, effective 30 days from a November 27 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1994) As a supervising attorney for the Law Offices of David J. Stern, P.A., McComas failed to exercise her authority to ensure that the actions of those she managed comported with Florida Bar rules. Those actions included a failure of the attorneys to appear in court for conferences or hearings, substandard preparation of mortgage foreclosure files, and allowing the filing of documents that were improperly notarized, witnessed, or dated. (Case No. SC13-1923) Robert Mike II,  P.O. Box 916173,  Longwood, suspended  for 90 days, effective 30 days from a November 21 court order. Further, Mike shall pay  restitution  of more than $1,500 to two clients. (Admitted to practice: 1977) Mike was hired to handle two separate dissolution of marriage cases, and he failed to adequately communicate or provide meaningful service. (Case No. SC13-644) Paul Creel Miniclier,  1305 Dublin St.,  New Orleans,  to be  publicly reprimanded  following a November 21 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1986) Miniclier is also a member of the Louisiana Bar. This is a reciprocal discipline case based on Miniclier’s discipline in Louisiana. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit affirmed a district court ruling, which identified numerous offending pleadings filed by Miniclier and awarded sanctions based on the time required by the defendants to respond to those pleadings. (Case No. SC12-2393)  Carlos Michael Muniz,  1800 S.W. 27th Ave., Suite 201,  Miami, suspended  for 10 days, effective 30 days from a November 27 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1999) In the course of representing a client in a paternity action, Muniz was combative and abusive to the judge, such that the proceedings were disrupted. The judge had to stop the hearing and recuse herself. She also filed a Bar complaint against Muniz. (Case No. SC12-1421) Brian John Murtha,  7640 N. Wickham Road, Suite 121,  Melbourne, suspended  until further order, effective 30 days from a November 5 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1987) Murtha was found in contempt for failure to comply with the terms of an October 15, 2012, court order in which he was publicly reprimanded and placed on probation. Murtha was required to retain the services of a certified public accountant to review his trust accounts monthly. Quarterly statements were to be prepared by the CPA for review by The Florida Bar. (Case No. SC13-901) Jeffrey Alan Norkin,  408 N.E. Sixth St., Unit 625,  Ft. Lauderdale, suspended  for two years, following an October 31 court order. Further, Norkin shall receive a  public reprimand  that will be administered by the court. (Admitted to practice: 1993) Norkin engaged in numerous acts of misconduct by behaving in an unprofessional and antagonistic manner during the course of litigating a civil case. The court considered his behavior an embarrassment to the profession. (Case No.SC13-56) Pamela Bounds Olsen,  P.O. Box 3612,  Ocala, suspended  for 30 days, effective 30 days from a November 27 court order. Further, upon reinstatement, Olsen is placed on  probation  for one year. (Admitted to practice: 1991) In five separate cases over a one-year period, Olsen received referral fees to which her law firm claimed entitlement and did not share them with the law firm. (Case No. SC13-1911) Jean M. Picon,  P.O. Box 410004,  Melbourne,  to be  publicly reprimanded  following an October 15 court order. (Admitted to practice: 2003) Picon failed to comply with the terms of an April 29, 2011, suspension order. Picon admitted to violating the probationary terms by not meeting her financial obligations and failing to respond to Bar inquiries. (Case No. SC13-918) Eugene Keith Polk,  201 E. Government St.,  Pensacola, suspended  for 90 days, followed by three years probation, after a November 14 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1994) After being retained, Polk failed to communicate with a client for nearly two years and failed to return documents despite numerous requests. He failed to respond to Bar inquiries for several months and misrepresented to the referee during the course of the disciplinary proceedings. (Case No. SC11-2500) Jacob Addington Rose,  931 Village Blvd., Suite 905-299,  West Palm Beach, disbarred  effective immediately, following a November 6 court order. Further, Rose shall pay  restitution  of $1,600 to two clients. (Admitted to practice: 1976) In three separate cases, Rose failed to provide adequate representation to clients. He charged excessive fees, failed to appear at hearings, and failed to communicate with clients. Due to his inaction in one matter, the client was forced to retain new counsel. (Case Nos. SC11-1482 & SC11-1829) R. Eric Rubio,  P.O. Box 1813,  Valrico, suspended  for 30 days, effective 30 days from a November 27 court order, and further placed on  probation  for three years. Criminal charges were filed against Rubio in Hillsborough County for making repeated phone calls, a second degree misdemeanor. In April 2010, Rubio called the personal cell phone of a deputy sheriff and left 10 voicemail messages containing explicit language, racial slurs, and threats. (Case No. SC13-297)  Michael J. Scaglione,  2600 S. Douglas Road, Ph. 10,  Coral Gables, suspended  until further order, effective December 23, following a November 18 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1999) Scaglione pleaded guilty to one count of money laundering. (Case No. SC13-1986) Eric A. Simon,  17831 Lake Estates Drive,  Boca Raton, suspended  for 90 days, effective December 9, following a November 27 court order. (Admitted to practice: 1978) Simon served as the escrow agent for the developer of a condominium project. A dispute ensued between the purchaser and the developer when a condominium’s certificate of occupancy was not issued when agreed to by contract. Instead of returning the $49,000 deposit to the purchaser or turning the funds over to the court for an interpleader action, Simon remitted the funds to the developer without advising the purchaser. (Case No. SC13-249)._____________ As an official arm of the Florida Supreme Court, The Florida Bar and its Department of Lawyer Regulation are charged with administering a statewide disciplinary system to enforce Supreme Court rules of professional conduct for the 98,000-plus lawyers admitted to practice law in Florida. Discipline cases that are public record are posted to the attorney’s individual profile at www.floridabar.org . Additional information on the discipline system and how to file a complaint are available at www.floridabar.org/attorneydiscipline . Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline. Disbarred lawyers may not re-apply for admission for five years. They are required to go through an extensive process that rejects many who apply. It includes a rigorous background check and retaking the bar exam. Historically, less than 5 percent of disbarred lawyers seek readmission.last_img read more

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Executive Q&A: Janelle Schick

first_imgJanelle SchickPresident, Schick Design Group, LLCYears in CRE: 39Years at Company: 14Q: What attracted you to the industry?A: My mother had a designer redo our condo and coming home to that transformation must have been the start of realizing the positive effects of well-designed environments. I remember being shocked during my first year at college to learn you could get a degree in interior design. I had started design classes when my architect brother-in-law introduced me to my first boss. She ran a top-rated interior design firm within a much larger commercial architectural firm. From that point on, I was hooked.Q: How has the industry changed since you started?A: Specialization has played a major role in the advancement of the interior design profession. The direction designers can choose spans between corporate, hospitality, healthcare or residential with specialization within each of those categories. Interior performance can now be measured based on our designed environments producing higher productivity, greater creativity and innovation, increased patronage or sales. It’s not design just for visual impact, but also for innovation, quality and sustainable performance, health, comfort, flexibility and ease of use. The addition of product accessibility for the public has also opened new challenges for the residential designer, as well as retailers and “to the trade” showrooms.Q: What professional achievement gives you the most pride?A: Owning my own firm was not something I visualized early in my career. In 1999, with a six-year partnership at its end, the next logical progression was Schick Design Group. Building the firm into one of the top design firms in the Valley has given us the ability to have a very positive effect on the industry and community. Being involved in several community service projects throughout the Valley gives us the opportunity to help others achieve some of the success we have experienced.last_img read more

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For London’s skyline, the only way is up

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Google boozers fancy a pint

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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